Curated Optogenetic Publication Database

Search precisely and efficiently by using the advantage of the hand-assigned publication tags that allow you to search for papers involving a specific trait, e.g. a particular optogenetic switch or a host organism.

Showing 201 - 225 of 1087 results
201.

Optogenetic stimulation of phosphoinositides reveals a critical role of primary cilia in eye pressure regulation.

blue CRY2/CIB1 GM01676 hTERT RPE-1 human retinal pigment epithelium cells mouse in vivo Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
Sci Adv, 29 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aay8699 Link to full text
Abstract: Glaucoma is a group of progressive optic neuropathies that cause irreversible vision loss. Although elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is associated with the development and progression of glaucoma, the mechanisms for its regulation are not well understood. Here, we have designed CIBN/CRY2-based optogenetic constructs to study phosphoinositide regulation within distinct subcellular compartments. We show that stimulation of CRY2-OCRL, an inositol 5-phosphatase, increases aqueous humor outflow and lowers IOP in vivo, which is caused by a calcium-dependent actin rearrangement of the trabecular meshwork cells. Phosphoinositide stimulation also rescues defective aqueous outflow and IOP in a Lowe syndrome mouse model but not in IFT88fl/fl mice that lack functional cilia. Thus, our study is the first to use optogenetics to regulate eye pressure and demonstrate that tight regulation of phosphoinositides is critical for aqueous humor homeostasis in both normal and diseased eyes.
202.

Nano-positioning and tubuline conformation determine transport of mitochondria along microtubules.

blue TULIP primary mouse hippocampal neurons Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape Organelle manipulation
bioRxiv, 28 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1101/2020.04.27.064766 Link to full text
Abstract: Correct spatiotemporal distribution of organelles and vesicles is crucial for healthy cell functioning and is regulated by intracellular transport mechanisms. Controlled transport of bulky mitochondria is especially important in polarized cells such as neurons that rely on these organelles to locally produce energy and buffer calcium. Mitochondrial transport requires and depends on microtubules which fill much of the available axonal space. How mitochondrial transport is affected by their position within the microtubule bundles is not known. Here, we found that anterograde transport, driven by kinesin motors, is susceptible to the molecular conformation of tubulin both in vitro and in vivo. Anterograde velocities negatively correlate with the density of elongated tubulin dimers, similar to GTP-tubulin, that are more straight and rigid. The impact of the tubulin conformation depends primarily on where a mitochondrion is positioned, either within or at the rim of microtubule bundle. Increasing elongated tubulin levels lowers the number of motile anterograde mitochondria within the microtubule bundle and increases anterograde transport speed at the microtubule bundle rim. We demonstrate that the increased kinesin step processivity on microtubules consisting of elongated dimers underlies increased mitochondrial dynamics. Our work indicates that the molecular conformation of tubulin controls mitochondrial motility and as such locally regulates the distribution of mitochondria along axons.
203.

Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate directly interacts with the β and γ subunits of the sodium channel ENaC.

blue CRY2/CIB1 HEK293 Organelle manipulation
J Biol Chem, 27 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1074/jbc.ra120.012606 Link to full text
Abstract: The plasma membrane phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) regulates the activity of diverse ion channels to include the epithelial Na+ channel ENaC. Whether PIP2 regulation of ENaC is due to a direct phospholipid-protein interaction, though, remains obscure. To date, possible interaction of PIP2 with ENaC primarily has been tested indirectly through assays of channel function. A fragment-based biochemical analysis approach is used here to directly quantify possible PIP2-ENaC interactions. We find using the CIBN-CRY2 optogenetic dimerization system that the phosphoryl group positioned at carbon 5 of PIP2 is necessary for interaction with ENaC. Previous studies have implicated conserved basic residues in the cytosolic portions of β- and γ-ENaC subunits as being important for PIP2-ENaC interactions. To test this, we used synthetic peptides of these regions of β- and γ-ENaC. Steady state intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that phosphoinositides change the local conformation of the N terminus of β-ENaC, and two sites of γ-ENaC adjacent to the plasma membrane, suggesting direct interactions of PIP2 with these three regions. Microscale thermophoresis elaborated PIP2 interactions with the amino termini of β- (Kd ~5.2 µM) and γ-ENaC (Kd ~13 µM). A weaker interaction site within the carboxy terminus of γ-ENaC (Kd ~800 µM) was also observed. These results support that PIP2 regulates ENaC activity by directly interacting with at least three distinct regions within the cytoplasmic domains of the channel that contain conserved basic residues. These interactions are probably electrostatic in nature, and are likely to bear a key structural role in support of channel activity.
204.

A combination of LightOn gene expression system and tumor microenvironment-responsive nanoparticle delivery system for targeted breast cancer therapy.

blue VVD 4T1 mouse in vivo Transgene expression Cell death
Acta Pharm Sin B, 27 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.apsb.2020.04.010 Link to full text
Abstract: A light-switchable transgene system called LightOn gene expression system could regulate gene expression with a high on/off ratio under blue light, and have great potential for spatiotemporally controllable gene expression. We developed a nanoparticle drug delivery system (NDDS) to achieve tumor microenvironment-responsive and targeted delivery of diphtheria toxin A (DTA) fragment-encoded plasmids to tumor sites. The expression of DTA was induced by exposure to blue light. Nanoparticles composed of polyethylenimine and vitamin E succinate linked by a disulfide bond, and PEGylated hyaluronic acid modified with RGD peptide, accumulated in tumor tissues and were actively internalized into 4T1 cells via dual targeting to CD44 and αvβ3 receptors. The LightOn gene expression system was able to control target protein expression through regulation of the intensity or duration of blue light exposure. In vitro studies showed that light-induced DTA expression reduced 4T1 cell viability and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the LightOn gene expression system enabled spatiotemporal control of the expression of DTA in a mouse 4T1 tumor xenograft model, which resulted in excellent antitumor effects, reduced tumor angiogenesis, and no systemic toxicity. The combination of the LightOn gene expression system and NDDS may be an effective strategy for treatment of breast cancer.
205.

Construction of Light-Activated Neurotrophin Receptors Using the Improved Light-Induced Dimerizer (iLID).

blue iLID PC-12 Signaling cascade control
J Mol Biol, 23 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmb.2020.04.018 Link to full text
Abstract: Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play crucial roles in human health, and their misregulation is implicated in disorders ranging from neurodegenerative diseases to cancers. The highly conserved mechanism of activation of RTKs makes them especially appealing candidates for control via optogenetic dimerization methods. This work offers a strategy for using the improved Light-Induced Dimer (iLID) system with a constructed tandem-dimer of its binding partner nano (tdnano) to build light-activatable versions of RTKs. In the absence of light, the iLID-RTK is cytosolic, monomeric and inactive. Under blue light, the iLID + tdnano system recruits two copies of iLID-RTK to tdnano, dimerizing and activating the RTK. We demonstrate that iLID opto-iTrkA and opto-iTrkB are capable of reproducing downstream ERK and Akt signaling only in the presence of tdnano. We further show with our opto-iTrkA that the system is compatible with multi-day and population-level activation of TrkA in PC12 cells. By leveraging genetic targeting of tdnano, we achieve RTK activation at a specific subcellular location even with whole-cell illumination, allowing us to confidently probe the impact of context on signaling outcome.
206.

Dynamic Fas signaling network regulates neural stem cell proliferation and memory enhancement.

blue CRY2/CRY2 HeLa mouse in vivo primary rat hippocampal neurons rat astrocytes rat oligodendrocyte Signaling cascade control
Sci Adv, 22 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaz9691 Link to full text
Abstract: Activation of Fas (CD95) is observed in various neurological disorders and can lead to both apoptosis and prosurvival outputs, yet how Fas signaling operates dynamically in the hippocampus is poorly understood. The optogenetic dissection of a signaling network can yield molecular-level explanations for cellular responses or fates, including the signaling dysfunctions seen in numerous diseases. Here, we developed an optogenetically activatable Fas that works in a physiologically plausible manner. Fas activation in immature neurons of the dentate gyrus triggered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation and subsequent brain-derived neurotrophic factor secretion. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) in neural stem cells was induced under prolonged Fas activation. Repetitive activation of this signaling network yielded proliferation of neural stem cells and a transient increase in spatial working memory in mice. Our results demonstrate a novel Fas signaling network in the dentate gyrus and illuminate its consequences for adult neurogenesis and memory enhancement.
207.

Nuclear actin regulates inducible transcription by enhancing RNA polymerase II clustering.

blue CRY2olig U-2 OS Organelle manipulation
Sci Adv, 15 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aay6515 Link to full text
Abstract: Gene expression in response to external stimuli underlies a variety of fundamental cellular processes. However, how the transcription machinery is regulated under these scenarios is largely unknown. Here, we discover a novel role of nuclear actin in inducible transcriptional regulation using next-generation transcriptome sequencing and super-resolution microscopy. The RNA-seq data reveal that nuclear actin is required for the establishment of the serum-induced transcriptional program. Using super-resolution imaging, we found a remarkable enhancement of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) clustering upon serum stimulation and this enhancement requires the presence of nuclear actin. To study the molecular mechanisms, we firstly observed that Pol II clusters co-localized with the serum-response genes and nuclear actin polymerized in adjacent to Pol II clusters upon serum stimulation. Furthermore, N-WASP and Arp2/3 are reported to interact with Pol II, and we demonstrated N-WASP is required for serum-enhanced Pol II clustering. Importantly, using an optogenetic tool, we revealed that N-WASP phase-separated with the carboxy-terminal domain of Pol II and nuclear actin. In addition to serum stimulation, we found nuclear actin also essential in enhancing Pol II clustering upon interferon-γ treatment. Taken together, our work unveils nuclear actin promotes the formation of transcription factory on inducible genes, acting as a general mechanism underlying the rapid response to environmental cues.
208.

Blue-Light-Switchable Bacterial Cell-Cell Adhesions Enable the Control of Multicellular Bacterial Communities.

blue Magnets E. coli Control of cell-cell / cell-material interactions
ACS Synth Biol, 15 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1021/acssynbio.0c00054 Link to full text
Abstract: Although the fundamental importance and biotechnological potential of multibacterial communities, also called biofilms, are well-known, our ability to control them is limited. We present a new way of dynamically controlling bacteria-bacteria adhesions by using blue light and how these photoswitchable adhesions can be used to regulate multicellularity and associated bacterial behavior. To achieve this, the photoswitchable proteins nMagHigh and pMagHigh were expressed on bacterial surfaces as adhesins to allow multicellular clusters to assemble under blue light and reversibly disassemble in the dark. Regulation of the bacterial cell-cell adhesions with visible light provides unique advantages including high spatiotemporal control, tunability, and noninvasive remote regulation. Moreover, these photoswitchable adhesions make it possible to regulate collective bacterial functions including aggregation, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and metabolic cross-feeding between auxotrophic bacteria with light. Overall, the photoregulation of bacteria-bacteria adhesions provides a new way of studying bacterial cell biology and will enable the design of biofilms for biotechnological applications.
209.

Bacterial Phytochrome as a Scaffold for Engineering of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Controlled with Near-Infrared Light.

red DrBphP HeLa PC6-3 Signaling cascade control
J Mol Biol, 14 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmb.2020.04.005 Link to full text
Abstract: Optically controlled receptor tyrosine kinases (opto-RTKs) allow regulation of RTK signaling using light. Until recently, the majority of opto-RTKs were activated with blue-green light. Fusing a photosensory core module of Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome (DrBphP-PCM) to the kinase domains of neurotrophin receptors resulted in opto-RTKs controlled with light above 650 nm. To expand this engineering approach to RTKs of other families, here we combined the DrBpP-PCM with the cytoplasmic domains of EGFR and FGFR1. The resultant Dr-EGFR and Dr-FGFR1 opto-RTKs are rapidly activated with near-infrared and inactivated with far-red light. The opto-RTKs efficiently trigger ERK1/2, PI3K/Akt, and PLCγ signaling. Absence of spectral crosstalk between the opto-RTKs and green fluorescent protein-based biosensors enables simultaneous Dr-FGFR1 activation and detection of calcium transients. Action mechanism of the DrBphP-PCM-based opto-RTKs is considered using the available RTK structures. DrBphP-PCM represents a versatile scaffold for engineering of opto-RTKs that are reversibly regulated with far-red and near-infrared light.
210.

A Single-Objective Light-Sheet Microscope with 200 nm-Scale Resolution.

blue CRY2/CIB1 MV3 Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
bioRxiv, 9 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1101/2020.04.07.030569 Link to full text
Abstract: We present a single-objective light-sheet microscope, also known as an oblique-plane microscope,that uses a bespoke glass-tipped tertiary objective andimproves the resolution, field of view, usability, and stability over previous variants. Owing to its highnumerical aperture optics, thismicroscope achieves the highest lateral resolution in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy, and its axial resolution is similar to that of Lattice Light-Sheet Microscopy.Given this performance, wedemonstrate high-resolution imaging of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, vimentin, the endoplasmic reticulum, membrane dynamics, and natural killer cell-mediated cell death. Furthermore, we image biological phenomena that would be otherwise challenging or impossibleto performin a traditional light-sheet microscope geometry, includingcell migration through a confined space within a microfluidic device, photoactivation of PI3K, and diffusionofcytoplasmic rheologicaltracersat a volumetric rate of 14 Hz.
211.

Turning Cell Adhesions ON or OFF with High Spatiotemporal Precision Using the Green Light Responsive Protein CarH.

green TtCBD MCF7 Control of cell-cell / cell-material interactions
Chemistry, 9 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1002/chem.202001238 Link to full text
Abstract: Spatiotemporal control of integrin-mediated cell adhesions to extracellular matrix regulates cell behavior with has numerous implications for biotechnological applications. In this work, two approaches for regulating cell adhesions in space and time with high precision are reported, both of which utilize green light. In the first design, CarH, which is a tetramer in the dark, is used to mask cRGD adhesion-peptides on a surface. Upon green light illumination, the CarH tetramer dissociates into its monomers, revealing the adhesion peptide so that cells can adhere. In the second design, the RGD motif is incorporated into the CarH protein tetramer such that cells can adhere to surfaces functionalized with this protein. The cell adhesions can be disrupted with green light, due to the disassembly of the CarH-RGD protein. Both designs allow for photoregulation with noninvasive visible light and open new possibilities to investigate the dynamical regulation of cell adhesions in cell biology.
212.

Exosome-based delivery of super-repressor IκBα relieves sepsis-associated organ damage and mortality.

blue CRY2/CIB1 HEK293T
Sci Adv, 8 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaz6980 Link to full text
Abstract: As extracellular vesicles that play an active role in intercellular communication by transferring cellular materials to recipient cells, exosomes offer great potential as a natural therapeutic drug delivery vehicle. The inflammatory responses in various disease models can be attenuated through introduction of super-repressor IκB (srIκB), which is the dominant active form of IκBα and can inhibit translocation of nuclear factor κB into the nucleus. An optogenetically engineered exosome system (EXPLOR) that we previously developed was implemented for loading a large amount of srIκB into exosomes. We showed that intraperitoneal injection of purified srIκB-loaded exosomes (Exo-srIκBs) attenuates mortality and systemic inflammation in septic mouse models. In a biodistribution study, Exo-srIκBs were observed mainly in the neutrophils, and in monocytes to a lesser extent, in the spleens and livers of mice. Moreover, we found that Exo-srIκB alleviates inflammatory responses in monocytic THP-1 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells.
213.

A Generalizable Optogenetic Strategy to Regulate Receptor Tyrosine Kinases during Vertebrate Embryonic Development.

blue CRY2/CIB1 VfAU1-LOV HEK293T PC-12 Xenopus in vivo Signaling cascade control Cell differentiation Developmental processes
J Mol Biol, 8 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmb.2020.03.032 Link to full text
Abstract: Ligand-independent activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) allows for dissecting out the receptor-specific signaling outcomes from the pleiotropic effects of the ligands. In this regard, RTK intracellular domains (ICD) are of interest due to their ability to recapitulate signaling activity in a ligand-independent manner when fused to chemical and optical dimerizing domains. A common strategy for synthetic activation of RTKs involves membrane tethering of dimerizer-RTK ICD fusions. Depending on the intrinsic signaling capacity, however, this approach could entail undesirable baseline signaling activity in the absence of stimulus, thereby diminishing the system's sensitivity. Here, we observed toxicity in early Xenopus laevis embryos when using such a conventional optogenetic design for the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). To surpass this challenge, we developed a cytoplasm-to-membrane translocation approach, where FGFR ICD is recruited from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane by light, followed by its subsequent activation via homo-association. This strategy results in the optical activation of FGFR with low background activity and high sensitivity, which allows for the light-mediated formation of ectopic tail-like structure in developing Xenopus laevis embryos. We further generalized this strategy by developing optogenetic platforms to control three neurotrophic tropomyosin receptor kinases, TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC. We envision that these ligand-independent optogenetic RTKs will provide useful toolsets for the delineation of signaling sub-circuits in developing vertebrate embryos.
214.

Combining optogenetics with sensitive FRET imaging to monitor local microtubule manipulations.

blue AsLOV2 HEK293T HeLa Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
Sci Rep, 7 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-62874-3 Link to full text
Abstract: Optogenetic methods for switching molecular states in cells are increasingly prominent tools in life sciences. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based sensors can provide quantitative and sensitive readouts of altered cellular biochemistry, e.g. from optogenetics. However, most of the light-inducible domains respond to the same wavelength as is required for excitation of popular CFP/YFP-based FRET pairs, rendering the techniques incompatible with each other. In order to overcome this limitation, we red-shifted an existing CFP/YFP-based OP18 FRET sensor (COPY) by employing an sYFP2 donor and mScarlet-I acceptor. Their favorable quantum yield and brightness result in a red-shifted FRET pair with an optimized dynamic range, which could be further enhanced by an R125I point mutation that stimulates intramolecular interactions. The new sensor was named ROPY and it visualizes the interaction between the microtubule regulator stathmin/OP18 and free tubulin heterodimers. We show that through phosphorylation of the ROPY sensor, its tubulin sequestering ability can be locally regulated by photo-activatable Rac1 (PARac1), independent of the FRET readout. Together, ROPY and PARac1 provide spatiotemporal control over free tubulin levels. ROPY/PARac1-based optogenetic regulation of free tubulin levels allowed us to demonstrate that depletion of free tubulin prevents the formation of pioneer microtubules, while local upregulation of tubulin concentration allows localized microtubule extensions to support the lamellipodia.
215.

An optimized toolbox for the optogenetic control of intracellular transport.

blue iLID VVD Cos-7 HeLa U-2 OS Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
J Cell Biol, 6 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201907149 Link to full text
Abstract: Cellular functioning relies on active transport of organelles by molecular motors. To explore how intracellular organelle distributions affect cellular functions, several optogenetic approaches enable organelle repositioning through light-inducible recruitment of motors to specific organelles. Nonetheless, robust application of these methods in cellular populations without side effects has remained challenging. Here, we introduce an improved toolbox for optogenetic control of intracellular transport that optimizes cellular responsiveness and limits adverse effects. To improve dynamic range, we employed improved optogenetic heterodimerization modules and engineered a photosensitive kinesin-3, which is activated upon blue light-sensitive homodimerization. This opto-kinesin prevented motor activation before experimental onset, limited dark-state activation, and improved responsiveness. In addition, we adopted moss kinesin-14 for efficient retrograde transport with minimal adverse effects on endogenous transport. Using this optimized toolbox, we demonstrate robust reversible repositioning of (endogenously tagged) organelles within cellular populations. More robust control over organelle motility will aid in dissecting spatial cell biology and transport-related diseases.
216.

Actin waves transport RanGTP to the neurite tip to regulate non-centrosomal microtubules in neurons.

blue LOVTRAP HeLa primary mouse cortical neurons primary mouse hippocampal neurons Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
J Cell Sci, 6 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1242/jcs.241992 Link to full text
Abstract: Microtubule (MT) is the most abundant cytoskeleton in neurons and controls multiple facets of their development. While the MT-organizing center (MTOC) in mitotic cells is typically located at the centrosome, MTOC in neurons switches to non-centrosomal sites. A handful of cellular components have been shown to promote non-centrosomal MT (ncMT) formation in neurons, yet the regulation mechanism remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that the small GTPase Ran is a key regulator of ncMTs in neurons. Using an optogenetic tool that enables light-induced local production of RanGTP, we demonstrate that RanGTP promotes ncMT plus-end growth along the neurite. Additionally, we discovered that actin waves drive the anterograde transport of RanGTP. Pharmacological disruption of actin waves abolishes the enrichment of RanGTP and reduces growing ncMT plus-ends at the neurite tip. These observations identify a novel regulation mechanism of ncMTs and pinpoint an indirect connection between the actin and MT cytoskeletons in neurons.
217.

The histone H4 basic patch regulates SAGA-mediated H2B deubiquitylation and histone acetylation.

blue AsLOV2 S. cerevisiae Epigenetic modification
J Biol Chem, 3 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1074/jbc.ra120.013196 Link to full text
Abstract: Histone H2B monoubiquitylation (H2Bub1) has central functions in multiple DNA-templated processes, including gene transcription, DNA repair, and replication. H2Bub1 also is required for the trans-histone regulation of H3K4 and H3K79 methylation. Although previous studies have elucidated the basic mechanisms that establish and remove H2Bub1, we have only an incomplete understanding of how H2Bub1 is regulated. We report here that the histone H4 basic patch regulates H2Bub1. Yeast cells with arginine-to-alanine mutations in the H4 basic patch (H42RA) exhibited significant loss of global H2Bub1. H42RA mutant yeast strains also displayed chemotoxin sensitivities similar to, but less severe than, strains containing a complete loss of H2Bub1. We found that the H4 basic patch regulates H2Bub1 levels independently of interactions with chromatin remodelers and separately from its regulation of H3K79 methylation. To measure H2B ubiquitylation and deubiquitination kinetics in vivo, we used a rapid and reversible optogenetic tool, the light-inducible nuclear exporter (LINX), to control the subcellular location of the H2Bub1 E3-ligase, Bre1. The ability of Bre1 to ubiquitylate H2B was unaffected in the H42RA mutant. In contrast, H2Bub1 deubiquitination by SAGA-associated Ubp8, but not by Ubp10, increased in the H42RA mutant. Consistent with a function for the H4 basic patch in regulating SAGA deubiquitinase activity, we also detected increased SAGA-mediated histone acetylation in H4 basic patch mutants. Our findings uncover that the H4 basic patch has a regulatory function in SAGA-mediated histone modifications.
218.

Blue Light-Directed Cell Migration, Aggregation, and Patterning.

blue EL222 E. coli Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape Endogenous gene expression
J Mol Biol, 2 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmb.2020.03.029 Link to full text
Abstract: Bacterial motility is related to many cellular activities, such as cell migration, aggregation, and biofilm formations. The ability to control motility and direct the bacteria to certain location could be used to guide the bacteria in applications such as seeking for and killing pathogen, forming various population-level patterns, and delivering of drugs and vaccines. Currently, bacteria motility is mainly controlled by chemotaxis (prescribed chemical stimuli), which needs physical contact with the chemical inducer. This lacks the flexibility for pattern formation as it has limited spatial control. To overcome the limitations, we developed blue light-regulated synthetic genetic circuit to control bacterial directional motility, by taking the advantage that light stimulus can be delivered to cells in different patterns with precise spatial control. The circuit developed enables programmed Escherichia coli cells to increase directional motility and move away from the blue light, i.e., that negative phototaxis is utilized. This further allows the control of the cells to form aggregation with different patterns. Further, we showed that the circuit can be used to separate two different strains. The demonstrated ability of blue light-controllable gene circuits to regulate a CheZ expression could give researchers more means to control bacterial motility and pattern formation.
219.

Controlling mRNA localization with light.

blue Cryptochromes Review
Nat Methods, Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1038/s41592-020-0804-1 Link to full text
Abstract: Abstract not available.
220.

Implementing Optogenetic Modulation in Mechanotransduction.

blue iLID in vitro mouse kidney fibroblasts Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
Phys Rev X, 1 Apr 2020 DOI: 10.1103/physrevx.10.021001 Link to full text
Abstract: Molecular optogenetic switch systems are extensively employed as a powerful tool to spatially and temporally modulate a variety of signal transduction processes in cells. However, the applications of such systems in mechanotransduction processes where the mechanosensing proteins are subject to mechanical forces of several piconewtons are poorly explored. In order to apply molecular optogenetic switch systems to mechanobiological studies, it is crucial to understand their mechanical stabilities which have yet to be quantified. In this work, we quantify a frequently used molecular optogenetic switch, iLID-nano, which is an improved light-induced dimerization between LOV2-SsrA and SspB. Our results show that the iLID-nano system can withstand forces up to 10 pN for seconds to tens of seconds that decrease as the force increases. The mechanical stability of the system suggests that it can be employed to modulate mechanotransduction processes that involve similar force ranges. We demonstrate the use of this system to control talin-mediated cell spreading and migration. Together, we establish the physical basis for utilizing the iLID-nano system in the direct control of intramolecular force transmission in cells during mechanotransduction processes.
221.

Application of optogenetic Amyloid-β distinguishes between metabolic and physical damage in neurodegeneration.

blue CRY2/CRY2 C. elegans in vivo D. melanogaster in vivo HEK293T zebrafish in vivo Developmental processes
Elife, 31 Mar 2020 DOI: 10.7554/elife.52589 Link to full text
Abstract: The brains of Alzheimer's Disease patients show a decrease in brain mass and a preponderance of extracellular Amyloid-β plaques. These plaques are formed by aggregation of polypeptides that are derived from the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP). Amyloid-β plaques are thought to play either a direct or an indirect role in disease progression, however the exact role of aggregation and plaque formation in the aetiology of Alzheimer's Disease is subject to debate as the biological effects of soluble and aggregated Amyloid-β peptides are difficult to separate in vivo. To investigate the consequences of formation of Amyloid-β oligomers in living tissues, we developed a fluorescently tagged, optogenetic Amyloid-β peptide that oligomerizes rapidly in the presence of blue light. We applied this system to the crucial question of how intracellular Amyloid-β oligomers underlie the pathologies of Alzheimer's Disease. We use Drosophila, C. elegans and D. rerio to show that, although both expression and induced oligomerization of Amyloid-β were detrimental to lifespan and healthspan, we were able to separate the metabolic and physical damage caused by light-induced Amyloid-β oligomerization from Amyloid-β expression alone. The physical damage caused by Amyloid-β oligomers also recapitulated the catastrophic tissue loss that is a hallmark of late AD. We show that the lifespan deficit induced by Amyloid-β oligomers was reduced with Li+ treatment. Our results present the first model to separate different aspects of disease progression.
222.

ActuAtor, a molecular tool for generating force in living cells: Controlled deformation of intracellular structures.

blue iLID U-2 OS Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
bioRxiv, 31 Mar 2020 DOI: 10.1101/2020.03.30.016360 Link to full text
Abstract: Mechanical force underlies fundamental cell functions such as division, migration and differentiation. While physical probes and devices revealed cellular mechano-responses, how force is translated inside cells to exert output functions remains largely unknown, due to the limited techniques to manipulate force intracellularly. By engineering an ActA protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor derived from Listeria monocytogenes, and implementing this in protein dimerization paradigms, we developed a molecular tool termed ActuAtor, with which actin polymerization can be triggered at intended subcellular locations to generate constrictive force in a rapidly inducible manner. The ActuAtor operation led to striking deformation of target intracellular structures including mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, nucleus, and non-membrane-bound RNA granules. Based on functional analysis before and after organelle deformation, we found the form-function relationship of mitochondria to be generally marginal. The modular design and genetically-encoded nature enable wide applications of ActuAtor for studies of intracellular mechanobiology processes.
223.

An optogenetic switch for the Set2 methyltransferase provides evidence for rapid transcription-dependent and independent dynamics of H3K36 methylation.

blue AsLOV2 S. cerevisiae Epigenetic modification
bioRxiv, 29 Mar 2020 DOI: 10.1101/2020.03.28.013706 Link to full text
Abstract: Background Histone H3 lysine 36 methylation (H3K36me) is a conserved histone modification associated with transcription and DNA repair. Although the effects of H3K36 methylation have been studied, the genome-wide dynamics of H3K36me deposition and removal are not known. Results We established rapid and reversible optogenetic control for Set2, the sole H3K36 methyltransferase in yeast, by fusing the enzyme with the light activated nuclear shuttle (LANS) domain. Early H3K36me3 dynamics identified rapid methylation in vivo, with total H3K36me3 levels correlating with RNA abundance. Although genes exhibited disparate levels of H3K36 methylation, relative rates of H3K36me3 accumulation were largely linear and consistent across genes, suggesting a rate-limiting mechanism for H3K36me3 deposition. Removal of H3K36me3 was also rapid and highly dependent on the demethylase Rph1. However, the per-gene rate of H3K36me3 loss weakly correlated with RNA abundance and followed exponential decay, suggesting H3K36 demethylases act in a global, stochastic manner. Conclusion Altogether, these data provide a detailed temporal view of H3K36 methylation and demethylation that suggest transcription-dependent and independent mechanisms for H3K36me deposition and removal, respectively.
224.

SynaptoPAC, an Optogenetic Tool for Induction of Presynaptic Plasticity.

blue bPAC (BlaC) mouse hippocampal slices ND7/23 rat dentate gyrus granule neurons rat hippocampal neurons Neuronal activity control
bioRxiv, 27 Mar 2020 DOI: 10.1101/2020.03.27.011635 Link to full text
Abstract: Optogenetic manipulations have transformed neuroscience in recent years. While sophisticated tools now exist for controlling the firing patterns of neurons, it remains challenging to optogenetically define the plasticity state of individual synapses. A variety of synapses in the mammalian brain express presynaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) upon elevation of presynaptic cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), but the molecular expression mechanisms as well as the impact of presynaptic LTP on network activity and behavior are not fully understood. In order to establish optogenetic control of presynaptic cAMP levels and thereby presynaptic potentiation, we developed synaptoPAC, a presynaptically targeted version of the photoactivated adenylyl cyclase bPAC. In cultures of hippocampal granule cells, activation of synaptoPAC with blue light increases action potential-evoked transmission, an effect not seen in hippocampal cultures of non-granule cells. In acute brain slices, synaptoPAC activation immediately triggers a strong presynaptic potentiation at mossy fiber terminals in CA3, but not at Schaffer collateral synapse in CA1. Following light-triggered potentiation, mossy fiber transmission decreases within 20 minutes, but remains enhanced still after 30 min. Optogenetic potentiation alters the short-term plasticity dynamics of release, reminiscent of presynaptic LTP. SynaptoPAC is the first optogenetic tool that allows acute light-controlled potentiation of transmitter release at specific synapses of the brain, and will enable to investigate the role of presynaptic potentiation in network function and the animal’s behavior in an unprecedented manner.
225.

Light-inducible generation of membrane curvature in live cells with engineered BAR domain proteins.

blue cyan iLID pdDronpa1 Cos-7 U-2 OS Organelle manipulation
ACS Synth Biol, 26 Mar 2020 DOI: 10.1021/acssynbio.9b00516 Link to full text
Abstract: Nanoscale membrane curvature is now understood to play an active role in essential cellular processes such as endocytosis, exocytosis and actin dynamics. Previous studies have shown that membrane curvature can directly affect protein function and intracellular signaling. However, few methods are able to precisely manipulate membrane curvature in live cells. Here, we report the development of a new method of generating nanoscale membrane curvature in live cells that is controllable, reversible, and capable of precise spatial and temporal manipulation. For this purpose, we make use of BAR domain proteins, a family of well-studied membrane-remodeling and membrane-sculpting proteins. Specifically, we engineered two optogenetic systems, opto-FBAR and opto-IBAR, that allow light-inducible formation of positive and negative membrane curvature, respectively. Using opto-FBAR, blue light activation results in the formation of tubular membrane invaginations (positive curvature), controllable down to the subcellular level. Using opto-IBAR, blue light illumination results in the formation of membrane protrusions or filopodia (negative curvature). These systems present a novel approach for light-inducible manipulation of nanoscale membrane curvature in live cells.
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