Curated Optogenetic Publication Database

Search precisely and efficiently by using the advantage of the hand-assigned publication tags that allow you to search for papers involving a specific trait, e.g. a particular optogenetic switch or a host organism.

Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results
1.

Optogenetic control of cofilin and αTAT in living cells using Z-lock.

blue LOVTRAP HEK293T HeLa MTLn3 Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
Nat Chem Biol, 18 Nov 2019 DOI: 10.1038/s41589-019-0405-4 Link to full text
Abstract: Here we introduce Z-lock, an optogenetic approach for reversible, light-controlled steric inhibition of protein active sites. The light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain and Zdk, a small protein that binds LOV selectively in the dark, are appended to the protein of interest where they sterically block the active site. Irradiation causes LOV to change conformation and release Zdk, exposing the active site. Computer-assisted protein design was used to optimize linkers and Zdk-LOV affinity, for both effective binding in the dark, and effective light-induced release of the intramolecular interaction. Z-lock cofilin was shown to have actin severing ability in vitro, and in living cancer cells it produced protrusions and invadopodia. An active fragment of the tubulin acetylase αTAT was similarly modified and shown to acetylate tubulin on irradiation.
2.

Light-dependent cytoplasmic recruitment enhances the dynamic range of a nuclear import photoswitch.

blue LOVTRAP C. elegans in vivo HeLa S. cerevisiae Developmental processes
Chembiochem, 14 Feb 2018 DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201700681 Link to full text
Abstract: Cellular signal transduction is often regulated at multiple steps in order to achieve more complex logic or precise control of a pathway. For instance, some signaling mechanisms couple allosteric activation with localization to achieve high signal to noise. Here, we create a system for light activated nuclear import that incorporates two levels of control. It consists of a nuclear import photoswitch, Light Activated Nuclear Shuttle (LANS), and a protein engineered to preferentially interact with LANS in the dark, Zdk2. First, Zdk2 is tethered to a location in the cytoplasm, which sequesters LANS in the dark. Second, LANS incorporates a nuclear localization signal (NLS) that is sterically blocked from binding to the nuclear import machinery in the dark. When activated with light, LANS both dissociates from its tethered location and exposes its NLS, which leads to nuclear accumulation. We demonstrate that this coupled system improves the dynamic range of LANS in mammalian cells, yeast, and C. elegans and provides tighter control of transcription factors that have been fused to LANS.
3.

Local control of intracellular microtubule dynamics by EB1 photodissociation.

blue LOVTRAP NCI-H1299 Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
Nat Cell Biol, 29 Jan 2018 DOI: 10.1038/s41556-017-0028-5 Link to full text
Abstract: End-binding proteins (EBs) are adaptors that recruit functionally diverse microtubule plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs) to growing microtubule plus ends. To test with high spatial and temporal accuracy how, when and where +TIP complexes contribute to dynamic cell biology, we developed a photo-inactivated EB1 variant (π-EB1) by inserting a blue-light-sensitive protein–protein interaction module between the microtubule-binding and +TIP-binding domains of EB1. π-EB1 replaces endogenous EB1 function in the absence of blue light. By contrast, blue-light-mediated π-EB1 photodissociation results in rapid +TIP complex disassembly, and acutely and reversibly attenuates microtubule growth independent of microtubule end association of the microtubule polymerase CKAP5 (also known as ch-TOG and XMAP215). Local π-EB1 photodissociation allows subcellular control of microtubule dynamics at the second and micrometre scale, and elicits aversive turning of migrating cancer cells. Importantly, light-mediated domain splitting can serve as a template to optically control other intracellular protein activities.
4.

LOVTRAP: A Versatile Method to Control Protein Function with Light.

blue LOVTRAP Cos-7 HEK293 HeLa
Curr Protoc Cell Biol, 1 Dec 2016 DOI: 10.1002/cpcb.12 Link to full text
Abstract: We describe a detailed procedure for the use of LOVTRAP, an approach to reversibly sequester and release proteins from cellular membranes using light. In the application described here, proteins that act at the plasma membrane are held at mitochondria in the dark, and reversibly released by irradiation. The technique relies on binding of an engineered Zdk domain to a LOV2 domain, with affinity <30 nM in the dark and >500 nM upon irradiation between 400 and 500 nm. LOVTRAP can be applied to diverse proteins, as it requires attaching only one member of the Zdk/LOV2 pair to the target protein, and the other to the membrane where the target protein is to be sequestered. Light-induced protein release occurs in less than a second, and the half-life of return can be adjusted using LOV point mutations (∼2 to 500 sec). © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
5.

LOVTRAP: an optogenetic system for photoinduced protein dissociation.

blue LOVTRAP HEK293 HeLa in vitro Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
Nat Methods, 18 Jul 2016 DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.3926 Link to full text
Abstract: LOVTRAP is an optogenetic approach for reversible light-induced protein dissociation using protein A fragments that bind to the LOV domain only in the dark, with tunable kinetics and a >150-fold change in the dissociation constant (Kd). By reversibly sequestering proteins at mitochondria, we precisely modulated the proteins' access to the cell edge, demonstrating a naturally occurring 3-mHz cell-edge oscillation driven by interactions of Vav2, Rac1, and PI3K proteins.
6.

Control of Protein Activity and Cell Fate Specification via Light-Mediated Nuclear Translocation.

blue AsLOV2 C. elegans in vivo Cos-7 HEK293 HeLa S. cerevisiae Developmental processes
PLoS ONE, 17 Jun 2015 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0128443 Link to full text
Abstract: Light-activatable proteins allow precise spatial and temporal control of biological processes in living cells and animals. Several approaches have been developed for controlling protein localization with light, including the conditional inhibition of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) with the Light Oxygen Voltage (AsLOV2) domain of phototropin 1 from Avena sativa. In the dark, the switch adopts a closed conformation that sterically blocks the NLS motif. Upon activation with blue light the C-terminus of the protein unfolds, freeing the NLS to direct the protein to the nucleus. A previous study showed that this approach can be used to control the localization and activity of proteins in mammalian tissue culture cells. Here, we extend this result by characterizing the binding properties of a LOV/NLS switch and demonstrating that it can be used to control gene transcription in yeast. Additionally, we show that the switch, referred to as LANS (light-activated nuclear shuttle), functions in the C. elegans embryo and allows for control of nuclear localization in individual cells. By inserting LANS into the C. elegans lin-1 locus using Cas9-triggered homologous recombination, we demonstrated control of cell fate via light-dependent manipulation of a native transcription factor. We conclude that LANS can be a valuable experimental method for spatial and temporal control of nuclear localization in vivo.
7.

Manipulation of endogenous kinase activity in living cells using photoswitchable inhibitory peptides.

blue AsLOV2 Cos-7 HEK293 primary mouse cortical neurons Signaling cascade control Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
ACS Synth Biol, 13 Jun 2014 DOI: 10.1021/sb5001356 Link to full text
Abstract: Optogenetic control of endogenous signaling can be an important tool for probing cell behavior. Using the photoresponse of the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1, we developed analogues of kinase inhibitors whose activity is light dependent. Inhibitory peptides were appended to the Jα helix, where they potently inhibited kinases in the light but were sterically blocked from kinase interaction in the dark. Photoactivatable inhibitors for cyclic-AMP dependent kinase (PKA) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) are described, together with studies that shed light on proper positioning of the peptides in the LOV domain. These inhibitors altered endogenous signaling in living cells and produced light-dependent changes in cell morphodynamics.
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