Curated Optogenetic Publication Database

Search precisely and efficiently by using the advantage of the hand-assigned publication tags that allow you to search for papers involving a specific trait, e.g. a particular optogenetic switch or a host organism.

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results
1.

Optogenetic Control of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondria Tethering.

blue near-infrared BphP1/Q-PAS1 FKF1/GI iLID Magnets HEK293T NIH/3T3 primary mouse cortical neurons Organelle manipulation
ACS Synth Biol, 4 Dec 2017 DOI: 10.1021/acssynbio.7b00248 Link to full text
Abstract: The organelle interface emerges as a dynamic platform for a variety of biological responses. However, their study has been limited by the lack of tools to manipulate their occurrence in live cells spatiotemporally. Here, we report the development of a genetically encoded light-inducible tethering (LIT) system allowing the induction of contacts between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, taking advantage of a pair of light-dependent heterodimerization called an iLID system. We demonstrate that the iLID-based LIT approach enables control of ER-mitochondria tethering with high spatiotemporal precision in various cell types including primary neurons, which will facilitate the functional study of ER-mitochondrial contacts.
2.

Optimized light-inducible transcription in mammalian cells using Flavin Kelch-repeat F-box1/GIGANTEA and CRY2/CIB1.

blue CRY2/CIB1 FKF1/GI HEK293T human primary dermal fibroblasts isolated MEFs NIH/3T3 Transgene expression
Nucleic Acids Res, 10 Oct 2017 DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkx804 Link to full text
Abstract: Light-inducible systems allow spatiotemporal control of a variety of biological activities. Here, we report newly optimized optogenetic tools to induce transcription with light in mammalian cells, using the Arabidopsis photoreceptor Flavin Kelch-repeat F-box 1 (FKF1) and its binding partner GIGANTEA (GI) as well as CRY2/CIB1. By combining the mutagenesis of FKF1 with the optimization of a split FKF1/GI dimerized Gal4-VP16 transcriptional system, we identified constructs enabling significantly improved light-triggered transcriptional induction. In addition, we have improved the CRY2/CIB1-based light-inducible transcription with split construct optimization. The improvements regarding the FKF1/GI- and CRY2/CIB1-based systems will be widely applicable for the light-dependent control of transcription in mammalian cells.
3.

Optogenetics: Switching with red and blue.

blue near-infrared red LOV domains Phytochromes Review
Nat Chem Biol, 17 May 2017 DOI: 10.1038/nchembio.2387 Link to full text
Abstract: Abstract not available.
4.

A photoactivatable Cre-loxP recombination system for optogenetic genome engineering.

blue CRY2/CIB1 Magnets CHO-K1 Cos-7 HEK293 HeLa mouse in vivo NIH/3T3
Nat Chem Biol, 10 Oct 2016 DOI: 10.1038/nchembio.2205 Link to full text
Abstract: Genome engineering techniques represented by the Cre-loxP recombination system have been used extensively for biomedical research. However, powerful and useful techniques for genome engineering that have high spatiotemporal precision remain elusive. Here we develop a highly efficient photoactivatable Cre recombinase (PA-Cre) to optogenetically control genome engineering in vivo. PA-Cre is based on the reassembly of split Cre fragments by light-inducible dimerization of the Magnet system. PA-Cre enables sharp induction (up to 320-fold) of DNA recombination and is efficiently activated even by low-intensity illumination (∼0.04 W m(-2)) or short periods of pulsed illumination (∼30 s). We demonstrate that PA-Cre allows for efficient DNA recombination in an internal organ of living mice through noninvasive external illumination using a LED light source. The present PA-Cre provides a powerful tool to greatly facilitate optogenetic genome engineering in vivo.
5.

Induction of protein-protein interactions in live cells using light.

blue FKF1/GI HEK293T NIH/3T3 Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
Nat Biotechnol, 4 Oct 2009 DOI: 10.1038/nbt.1569 Link to full text
Abstract: Protein-protein interactions are essential for many cellular processes. We have developed a technology called light-activated dimerization (LAD) to artificially induce protein hetero- and homodimerization in live cells using light. Using the FKF1 and GIGANTEA (GI) proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana, we have generated protein tags whose interaction is controlled by blue light. We demonstrated the utility of this system with LAD constructs that can recruit the small G-protein Rac1 to the plasma membrane and induce the local formation of lamellipodia in response to focal illumination. We also generated a light-activated transcription factor by fusing domains of GI and FKF1 to the DNA binding domain of Gal4 and the transactivation domain of VP16, respectively, showing that this technology is easily adapted to other systems. These studies set the stage for the development of light-regulated signaling molecules for controlling receptor activation, synapse formation and other signaling events in organisms.
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