Curated Optogenetic Publication Database

Search precisely and efficiently by using the advantage of the hand-assigned publication tags that allow you to search for papers involving a specific trait, e.g. a particular optogenetic switch or a host organism.

Showing 1 - 13 of 13 results
1.

A size-invariant bud-duration timer enables robustness in yeast cell size control.

red PhyB/PIF6 S. cerevisiae Cell cycle control
PLoS ONE, 21 Dec 2018 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0209301 Link to full text
Abstract: Cell populations across nearly all forms of life generally maintain a characteristic cell type-dependent size, but how size control is achieved has been a long-standing question. The G1/S boundary of the cell cycle serves as a major point of size control, and mechanisms operating here restrict passage of cells to Start if they are too small. In contrast, it is less clear how size is regulated post-Start, during S/G2/M. To gain further insight into post-Start size control, we prepared budding yeast that can be reversibly blocked from bud initiation. While blocked, cells continue to grow isotropically, increasing their volume by more than an order of magnitude over unperturbed cells. Upon release from their block, giant mothers reenter the cell cycle and their progeny rapidly return to the original unperturbed size. We found this behavior to be consistent with a size-invariant 'timer' specifying the duration of S/G2/M. These results indicate that yeast use at least two distinct mechanisms at different cell cycle phases to ensure size homeostasis.
2.

A module for Rac temporal signal integration revealed with optogenetics.

red PhyB/PIF6 HL-60 Signaling cascade control Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
J Cell Biol, 7 Jul 2017 DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201604113 Link to full text
Abstract: Sensory systems use adaptation to measure changes in signaling inputs rather than absolute levels of signaling inputs. Adaptation enables eukaryotic cells to directionally migrate over a large dynamic range of chemoattractant. Because of complex feedback interactions and redundancy, it has been difficult to define the portion or portions of eukaryotic chemotactic signaling networks that generate adaptation and identify the regulators of this process. In this study, we use a combination of optogenetic intracellular inputs, CRISPR-based knockouts, and pharmacological perturbations to probe the basis of neutrophil adaptation. We find that persistent, optogenetically driven phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) production results in only transient activation of Rac, a hallmark feature of adaptive circuits. We further identify the guanine nucleotide exchange factor P-Rex1 as the primary PIP3-stimulated Rac activator, whereas actin polymerization and the GTPase-activating protein ArhGAP15 are essential for proper Rac turnoff. This circuit is masked by feedback and redundancy when chemoattractant is used as the input, highlighting the value of probing signaling networks at intermediate nodes to deconvolve complex signaling cascades.
3.

TAEL: a zebrafish-optimized optogenetic gene expression system with fine spatial and temporal control.

blue EL222 zebrafish in vivo Transgene expression Developmental processes
Development, 19 Dec 2016 DOI: 10.1242/dev.139238 Link to full text
Abstract: Here, we describe an optogenetic gene expression system optimized for use in zebrafish. This system overcomes the limitations of current inducible expression systems by enabling robust spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression in living organisms. Because existing optogenetic systems show toxicity in zebrafish, we re-engineered the blue-light-activated EL222 system for minimal toxicity while exhibiting a large range of induction, fine spatial precision and rapid kinetics. We validate several strategies to spatially restrict illumination and thus gene induction with our new TAEL (TA4-EL222) system. As a functional example, we show that TAEL is able to induce ectopic endodermal cells in the presumptive ectoderm via targeted sox32 induction. We also demonstrate that TAEL can be used to resolve multiple roles of Nodal signaling at different stages of embryonic development. Finally, we show how inducible gene editing can be achieved by combining the TAEL and CRISPR/Cas9 systems. This toolkit should be a broadly useful resource for the fish community.
4.

Positioning the cleavage furrow: All you need is Rho.

blue LOV domains Review
J Cell Biol, 20 Jun 2016 DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201606010 Link to full text
Abstract: RhoA controls cleavage furrow formation during cell division, but whether RhoA suffices to orchestrate spatiotemporal dynamics of furrow formation is unknown. In this issue, Wagner and Goltzer (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201603025) show that RhoA activity can induce furrow formation in all cell cortex positions and cell cycle phases.
5.

Reversible Optogenetic Control of Subcellular Protein Localization in a Live Vertebrate Embryo.

red PhyB/PIF6 zebrafish in vivo
Dev Cell, 11 Jan 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2015.12.011 Link to full text
Abstract: We demonstrate the utility of the phytochrome system to rapidly and reversibly recruit proteins to specific subcellular regions within specific cells in a living vertebrate embryo. Light-induced heterodimerization using the phytochrome system has previously been used as a powerful tool to dissect signaling pathways for single cells in culture but has not previously been used to reversibly manipulate the precise subcellular location of proteins in multicellular organisms. Here we report the experimental conditions necessary to use this system to manipulate proteins in vivo. As proof of principle, we demonstrate that we can manipulate the localization of the apical polarity protein Pard3 with high temporal and spatial precision in both the neural tube and the embryo's enveloping layer epithelium. Our optimizations of optogenetic component expression and chromophore purification and delivery should significantly lower the barrier for establishing this powerful optogenetic system in other multicellular organisms.
6.

Probing Yeast Polarity with Acute, Reversible, Optogenetic Inhibition of Protein Function.

red PhyB/PIF6 S. cerevisiae Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape Cell cycle control
ACS Synth Biol, 2 Jun 2015 DOI: 10.1021/acssynbio.5b00053 Link to full text
Abstract: We recently developed a technique for rapidly and reversibly inhibiting protein function through light-inducible sequestration of proteins away from their normal sites of action. Here, we adapt this method for inducible inactivation of Bem1, a scaffold protein involved in budding yeast polarity. We find that acute inhibition of Bem1 produces profound defects in cell polarization and cell viability that are not observed in bem1Δ. By disrupting Bem1 activity at specific points in the cell cycle, we demonstrate that Bem1 is essential for the establishment of polarity and bud emergence but is dispensable for the growth of an emerged bud. By taking advantage of the reversibility of Bem1 inactivation, we show that pole size scales with cell size, and that this scaling is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. Our experiments reveal how rapid reversible inactivation of protein function complements traditional genetic approaches. This strategy should be widely applicable to other biological contexts.
7.

Illuminating cell signalling with optogenetic tools.

blue cyan red Cryptochromes Fluorescent proteins Phytochromes Review
Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol, 16 Jul 2014 DOI: 10.1038/nrm3837 Link to full text
Abstract: The light-based control of ion channels has been transformative for the neurosciences, but the optogenetic toolkit does not stop there. An expanding number of proteins and cellular functions have been shown to be controlled by light, and the practical considerations in deciding between reversible optogenetic systems (such as systems that use light-oxygen-voltage domains, phytochrome proteins, cryptochrome proteins and the fluorescent protein Dronpa) are well defined. The field is moving beyond proof of concept to answering real biological questions, such as how cell signalling is regulated in space and time, that were difficult or impossible to address with previous tools.
8.

An optogenetic gene expression system with rapid activation and deactivation kinetics.

blue EL222 HEK293T Jurkat zebrafish in vivo Transgene expression
Nat Chem Biol, 12 Jan 2014 DOI: 10.1038/nchembio.1430 Link to full text
Abstract: Optogenetic gene expression systems can control transcription with spatial and temporal detail unequaled with traditional inducible promoter systems. However, current eukaryotic light-gated transcription systems are limited by toxicity, dynamic range or slow activation and deactivation. Here we present an optogenetic gene expression system that addresses these shortcomings and demonstrate its broad utility. Our approach uses an engineered version of EL222, a bacterial light-oxygen-voltage protein that binds DNA when illuminated with blue light. The system has a large (>100-fold) dynamic range of protein expression, rapid activation (<10 s) and deactivation kinetics (<50 s) and a highly linear response to light. With this system, we achieve light-gated transcription in several mammalian cell lines and intact zebrafish embryos with minimal basal gene activation and toxicity. Our approach provides a powerful new tool for optogenetic control of gene expression in space and time.
9.

Using optogenetics to interrogate the dynamic control of signal transmission by the Ras/Erk module.

red PhyB/PIF6 NIH/3T3 PC-12 Signaling cascade control Cell cycle control Cell differentiation
Cell, 5 Dec 2013 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.11.004 Link to full text
Abstract: The complex, interconnected architecture of cell-signaling networks makes it challenging to disentangle how cells process extracellular information to make decisions. We have developed an optogenetic approach to selectively activate isolated intracellular signaling nodes with light and use this method to follow the flow of information from the signaling protein Ras. By measuring dose and frequency responses in single cells, we characterize the precision, timing, and efficiency with which signals are transmitted from Ras to Erk. Moreover, we elucidate how a single pathway can specify distinct physiological outcomes: by combining distinct temporal patterns of stimulation with proteomic profiling, we identify signaling programs that differentially respond to Ras dynamics, including a paracrine circuit that activates STAT3 only after persistent (>1 hr) Ras activation. Optogenetic stimulation provides a powerful tool for analyzing the intrinsic transmission properties of pathway modules and identifying how they dynamically encode distinct outcomes.
10.

A light-inducible organelle-targeting system for dynamically activating and inactivating signaling in budding yeast.

red PhyB/PIF6 S. cerevisiae Cell cycle control
Mol Biol Cell, 12 Jun 2013 DOI: 10.1091/mbc.e13-03-0126 Link to full text
Abstract: Protein localization plays a central role in cell biology. Although powerful tools exist to assay the spatial and temporal dynamics of proteins in living cells, our ability to control these dynamics has been much more limited. We previously used the phytochrome B- phytochrome-interacting factor light-gated dimerization system to recruit proteins to the plasma membrane, enabling us to control the activation of intracellular signals in mammalian cells. Here we extend this approach to achieve rapid, reversible, and titratable control of protein localization for eight different organelles/positions in budding yeast. By tagging genes at the endogenous locus, we can recruit proteins to or away from their normal sites of action. This system provides a general strategy for dynamically activating or inactivating proteins of interest by controlling their localization and therefore their availability to binding partners and substrates, as we demonstrate for galactose signaling. More importantly, the temporal and spatial precision of the system make it possible to identify when and where a given protein's activity is necessary for function, as we demonstrate for the mitotic cyclin Clb2 in nuclear fission and spindle stabilization. Our light-inducible organelle-targeting system represents a powerful approach for achieving a better understanding of complex biological systems.
11.

Light-based feedback for controlling intracellular signaling dynamics.

red PhyB/PIF6 NIH/3T3 Signaling cascade control
Nat Methods, 11 Sep 2011 DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.1700 Link to full text
Abstract: The ability to apply precise inputs to signaling species in live cells would be transformative for interrogating and understanding complex cell-signaling systems. Here we report an 'optogenetic' method for applying custom signaling inputs using feedback control of a light-gated protein-protein interaction. We applied this strategy to perturb protein localization and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity, generating time-varying signals and clamping signals to buffer against cell-to-cell variability or changes in pathway activity.
12.

Light control of plasma membrane recruitment using the Phy-PIF system.

red PhyB/PIF6 NIH/3T3
Meth Enzymol, 19 May 2011 DOI: 10.1016/b978-0-12-385075-1.00017-2 Link to full text
Abstract: The ability to control the activity of intracellular signaling processes in live cells would be an extraordinarily powerful tool. Ideally, such an intracellular input would be (i) genetically encoded, (ii) able to be turned on and off in defined temporal or spatial patterns, (iii) fast to switch between on and off states, and (iv) orthogonal to other cellular processes. The light-gated interaction between fragments of two plant proteins--termed Phy and PIF--satisfies each of these constraints. In this system, Phy can be switched between two conformations using red and infrared light, while PIF only binds one of these states. This chapter describes known constraints for designing genetic constructs using Phy and PIF and provides protocols for expressing these constructs in mammalian cells, purifying the small molecule chromophore required for the system's light responsivity, and measuring light-gated binding by microscopy.
13.

Spatiotemporal control of cell signalling using a light-switchable protein interaction.

red PhyB/PIF6 NIH/3T3 Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
Nature, 13 Sep 2009 DOI: 10.1038/nature08446 Link to full text
Abstract: Genetically encodable optical reporters, such as green fluorescent protein, have revolutionized the observation and measurement of cellular states. However, the inverse challenge of using light to control precisely cellular behaviour has only recently begun to be addressed; semi-synthetic chromophore-tethered receptors and naturally occurring channel rhodopsins have been used to perturb directly neuronal networks. The difficulty of engineering light-sensitive proteins remains a significant impediment to the optical control of most cell-biological processes. Here we demonstrate the use of a new genetically encoded light-control system based on an optimized, reversible protein-protein interaction from the phytochrome signalling network of Arabidopsis thaliana. Because protein-protein interactions are one of the most general currencies of cellular information, this system can, in principle, be generically used to control diverse functions. Here we show that this system can be used to translocate target proteins precisely and reversibly to the membrane with micrometre spatial resolution and at the second timescale. We show that light-gated translocation of the upstream activators of Rho-family GTPases, which control the actin cytoskeleton, can be used to precisely reshape and direct the cell morphology of mammalian cells. The light-gated protein-protein interaction that has been optimized here should be useful for the design of diverse light-programmable reagents, potentially enabling a new generation of perturbative, quantitative experiments in cell biology.
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