Curated Optogenetic Publication Database

Search precisely and efficiently by using the advantage of the hand-assigned publication tags that allow you to search for papers involving a specific trait, e.g. a particular optogenetic switch or a host organism.

Showing 1 - 25 of 44 results
1.

High levels of Dorsal transcription factor downregulate, not promote, snail expression by regulating enhancer action.

blue AsLOV2 D. melanogaster in vivo Developmental processes
bioRxiv, 11 Jan 2021 DOI: 10.1101/2021.01.11.426256 Link to full text
Abstract: In Drosophila embryos, genes expressed along the dorsal-ventral axis are responsive to concentration of the Dorsal (Dl) transcription factor, which varies in space; however, levels of this morphogen also build over time. Since expression of high-threshold Dl target genes such as snail (sna) is supported before Dl levels peak, it is unclear what role increasing levels have if any. Here we investigated action of two enhancers that control sna expression in embryos, demonstrating using genome editing that Dl binding sites within one enhancer located promoter proximally, sna.prox, can limit the ability of the other distally-located enhancer, sna.dis, to increase sna levels. In addition, MS2-MCP live imaging was used to study sna transcription rate in wildtype, dl heterozygote, and a background in which a photo-sensitive degron is fused to Dl (dl-BLID). The results demonstrate that, when Dl levels are high, Dl acts through sna.prox to limit the activity of sna.dis and thereby influence sna transcription rate. In contrast, when Dl levels are kept low using dl-BLID, sna.prox positively influences sna transcription rate. Collectively, our data support the view that Dl’s effect on gene expression changes over time, switching from promoting sna expression at low concentration to dampening sna expression at high concentration by regulating enhancer interactions. We propose this differential action of the Dl morphogen is likely supported by occupancy of this factor first to high and then low affinity binding sites over time as Dl levels rise to coordinate action of these two co-acting enhancers.
2.

Use of Optogenetic Amyloid-β to Monitor Protein Aggregation in Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio and Caenorhabditis elegans.

blue CRY2/CRY2 C. elegans in vivo D. melanogaster in vivo zebrafish in vivo
Bio Protoc, 5 Dec 2020 DOI: 10.21769/bioprotoc.3856 Link to full text
Abstract: Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has long been associated with accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques (Aβ) originating from the Amyloid Precursor Protein. Plaques have, however, been discovered in healthy individuals and not all AD brains show plaques, suggesting that extracellular Aβ aggregates may play a smaller role than anticipated. One limitation to studying Aβ peptide in vivo during disease progression is the inability to induce aggregation in a controlled manner. We developed an optogenetic method to induce Aβ aggregation and tested its biological influence in three model organisms-D. melanogaster, C. elegans and D. rerio. We generated a fluorescently labeled, optogenetic Aβ peptide that oligomerizes rapidly in vivo in the presence of blue light in all organisms. Here, we detail the procedures for expressing this fusion protein in animal models, investigating the effects on the nervous system using time lapse light-sheet microscopy, and performing metabolic assays to measure changes due to intracellular Aβ aggregation. This method, employing optogenetics to study the pathology of AD, allows spatial and temporal control in vivo that cannot be achieved by any other method at present.
3.

Spatiotemporal sensitivity of embryonic heart specification to FGFR signaling in Drosophila.

blue CRY2/CRY2 D. melanogaster in vivo Signaling cascade control Developmental processes
bioRxiv, 19 Nov 2020 DOI: 10.1101/2020.11.16.384123 Link to full text
Abstract: Development of the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm is controlled through both internal and external inputs to the mesoderm. One such factor is Heartless (Htl), a Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) expressed in the mesoderm. Htl is involved in shaping the mesoderm at both early and later stages during embryogenesis. How Htl expression levels and timing of signaling affect mesoderm morphogenesis after spreading remains elusive. We have developed an optogenetic tool (Opto-htl) to control the activation of Htl signaling with precise spatiotemporal resolution in vivo. We find that the embryo is most sensitive to Htl over-activation within a developmental window of ~4 hours ranging from late stage 10 until early stage 13, which corresponds to early stages of heart morphogenesis. Opto-htl restores heart cells in htl mutants upon light activation, independent of its role in early mesoderm shaping events. We also successfully generated spatially distinct regions of Htl activity in the mesoderm using light-sheet microscopy. The developing tissue was unable to correct for the ensuing asymmetries in cell fate. Overall, Opto-htl is a powerful tool for studying spatiotemporal regulation of Htl signaling during embryogenesis.
4.

Rho1 activation recapitulates early gastrulation events in the ventral, but not dorsal, epithelium of Drosophila embryos.

blue iLID D. melanogaster in vivo Developmental processes
Elife, 17 Nov 2020 DOI: 10.7554/elife.56893 Link to full text
Abstract: Ventral furrow formation, the first step in Drosophila gastrulation, is a well-studied example of tissue morphogenesis. Rho1 is highly active in a subset of ventral cells and is required for this morphogenetic event. However, it is unclear whether spatially patterned Rho1 activity alone is sufficient to recapitulate all aspects of this morphogenetic event, including anisotropic apical constriction and coordinated cell movements. Here, using an optogenetic probe that rapidly and robustly activates Rho1 in Drosophila tissues, we show that Rho1 activity induces ectopic deformations in the dorsal and ventral epithelia of Drosophila embryos. These perturbations reveal substantial differences in how ventral and dorsal cells, both within and outside the zone of Rho1 activation, respond to spatially and temporally identical patterns of Rho1 activation. Our results demonstrate that an asymmetric zone of Rho1 activity is not sufficient to recapitulate ventral furrow formation and reveal that additional, ventral-specific factors contribute to the cell- and tissue-level behaviors that emerge during ventral furrow formation.
5.

Mechanical competition alters the cellular interpretation of an endogenous genetic programme.

blue CRY2/CIB1 D. melanogaster in vivo Developmental processes
bioRxiv, 15 Oct 2020 DOI: 10.1101/2020.10.15.333963 Link to full text
Abstract: The intrinsic genetic programme of a cell is not sufficient to explain all of the cell’s activities. External mechanical stimuli are increasingly recognized as determinants of cell behaviour. In the epithelial folding event that constitutes the beginning of gastrulation in Drosophila, the genetic programme of the future mesoderm leads to the establishment of a contractile actomyosin network that triggers apical constriction of cells, and thereby, furrow formation. However, some cells do not constrict but instead stretch, even though they share the same genetic programme as their constricting neighbours. We show here that tissue-wide interactions force these cells to expand even when an otherwise sufficient amount of apical, active actomyosin is present. Models based on contractile forces and linear stress-strain responses are not sufficient to reproduce experimental observations, but simulations in which cells behave as ductile materials with non-linear mechanical properties do. Our models show that this behaviour is a general emergent property of supracellular actomyosin networks, in accordance with our experimental observations of actin reorganisation within stretching cells.
6.

Optical control of ERK and AKT signaling promotes axon regeneration and functional recovery of PNS and CNS in Drosophila.

blue CRY2/CIB1 D. melanogaster in vivo HEK293T PC-12 Signaling cascade control
Elife, 6 Oct 2020 DOI: 10.7554/elife.57395 Link to full text
Abstract: Neuroregeneration is a dynamic process synergizing the functional outcomes of multiple signaling circuits. Channelrhodopsin-based optogenetics shows the feasibility of stimulating neural repair but does not pin down specific signaling cascades. Here, we utilized optogenetic systems, optoRaf and optoAKT, to delineate the contribution of the ERK and AKT signaling pathways to neuroregeneration in live Drosophila larvae. We showed that optoRaf or optoAKT activation not only enhanced axon regeneration in both regeneration-competent and -incompetent sensory neurons in the peripheral nervous system but also allowed temporal tuning and proper guidance of axon regrowth. Furthermore, optoRaf and optoAKT differ in their signaling kinetics during regeneration, showing a gated versus graded response, respectively. Importantly in the central nervous system, their activation promotes axon regrowth and functional recovery of the thermonociceptive behavior. We conclude that non-neuronal optogenetics target damaged neurons and signaling subcircuits, providing a novel strategy in the intervention of neural damage with improved precision.
7.

Optogenetic TDP-43 nucleation induces persistent insoluble species and progressive motor dysfunction in vivo.

blue CRY2olig D. melanogaster in vivo Organelle manipulation
Neurobiol Dis, 11 Sep 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.nbd.2020.105078 Link to full text
Abstract: TDP-43 is a predominantly nuclear DNA/RNA binding protein that is often mislocalized into insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions in post-mortem patient tissue in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, most notably, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a fatal and progressive neuromuscular disorder. The underlying causes of TDP-43 proteinopathies remain unclear, but recent studies indicate the formation of these protein assemblies is driven by aberrant phase transitions of RNA deficient TDP-43. Technical limitations have prevented our ability to understand how TDP-43 proteinopathy relates to disease pathogenesis. Current animal models of TDP-43 proteinopathy often rely on overexpression of wild-type TDP-43 to non-physiological levels that may initiate neurotoxicity through nuclear gain of function mechanisms, or by the expression of disease-causing mutations found in only a fraction of ALS patients. New technologies allowing for light-responsive control of subcellular protein crowding provide a promising approach to drive intracellular protein aggregation, as we have previously demonstrated in vitro. Here we present a model for the optogenetic induction of TDP-43 aggregation in Drosophila that recapitulates key biochemical features seen in patient pathology, most notably light-inducible persistent insoluble species and progressive motor dysfunction. These data describe a photokinetic in vivo model that could be as a future platform to identify novel genetic and pharmacological modifiers of diseases associated with TDP-43 neuropathology.
8.

Dynamic centriolar localization of Polo and Centrobin in early mitosis primes centrosome asymmetry.

blue iLID D. melanogaster in vivo Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
PLoS Biol, 6 Aug 2020 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.3000762 Link to full text
Abstract: Centrosomes, the main microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs) of metazoan cells, contain an older "mother" and a younger "daughter" centriole. Stem cells either inherit the mother or daughter-centriole-containing centrosome, providing a possible mechanism for biased delivery of cell fate determinants. However, the mechanisms regulating centrosome asymmetry and biased centrosome segregation are unclear. Using 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and live-cell imaging, we show in fly neural stem cells (neuroblasts) that the mitotic kinase Polo and its centriolar protein substrate Centrobin (Cnb) accumulate on the daughter centriole during mitosis, thereby generating molecularly distinct mother and daughter centrioles before interphase. Cnb's asymmetric localization, potentially involving a direct relocalization mechanism, is regulated by Polo-mediated phosphorylation, whereas Polo's daughter centriole enrichment requires both Wdr62 and Cnb. Based on optogenetic protein mislocalization experiments, we propose that the establishment of centriole asymmetry in mitosis primes biased interphase MTOC activity, necessary for correct spindle orientation.
9.

Optogenetic Rescue of a Patterning Mutant.

red PhyB/PIF6 D. melanogaster in vivo Signaling cascade control Developmental processes
Curr Biol, 9 Jul 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2020.06.059 Link to full text
Abstract: Animal embryos are patterned by a handful of highly conserved inductive signals. Yet, in most cases, it is unknown which pattern features (i.e., spatial gradients or temporal dynamics) are required to support normal development. An ideal experiment to address this question would be to "paint" arbitrary synthetic signaling patterns on "blank canvas" embryos to dissect their requirements. Here, we demonstrate exactly this capability by combining optogenetic control of Ras/extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) signaling with the genetic loss of the receptor tyrosine-kinase-driven terminal signaling patterning in early Drosophila embryos. Blue-light illumination at the embryonic termini for 90 min was sufficient to rescue normal development, generating viable larvae and fertile adults from an otherwise lethal terminal signaling mutant. Optogenetic rescue was possible even using a simple, all-or-none light input that reduced the gradient of Erk activity and eliminated spatiotemporal differences in terminal gap gene expression. Systematically varying illumination parameters further revealed that at least three distinct developmental programs are triggered at different signaling thresholds and that the morphogenetic movements of gastrulation are robust to a 3-fold variation in the posterior pattern width. These results open the door to controlling tissue organization with simple optical stimuli, providing new tools to probe natural developmental processes, create synthetic tissues with defined organization, or directly correct the patterning errors that underlie developmental defects.
10.

βH-spectrin is required for ratcheting apical pulsatile constrictions during tissue invagination.

blue CRY2/CIB1 D. melanogaster in vivo Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape Developmental processes
EMBO Rep, 26 Jun 2020 DOI: 10.15252/embr.201949858 Link to full text
Abstract: Actomyosin-mediated apical constriction drives a wide range of morphogenetic processes. Activation of myosin-II initiates pulsatile cycles of apical constrictions followed by either relaxation or stabilization (ratcheting) of the apical surface. While relaxation leads to dissipation of contractile forces, ratcheting is critical for the generation of tissue-level tension and changes in tissue shape. How ratcheting is controlled at the molecular level is unknown. Here, we show that the actin crosslinker βH-spectrin is upregulated at the apical surface of invaginating mesodermal cells during Drosophila gastrulation. βH-spectrin forms a network of filaments which co-localize with medio-apical actomyosin fibers, in a process that depends on the mesoderm-transcription factor Twist and activation of Rho signaling. βH-spectrin knockdown results in non-ratcheted apical constrictions and inhibition of mesoderm invagination, recapitulating twist mutant embryos. βH-spectrin is thus a key regulator of apical ratcheting during tissue invagination, suggesting that actin cross-linking plays a critical role in this process.
11.

Twist-dependent ratchet functioning downstream from Dorsal revealed using a light-inducible degron.

blue AsLOV2 D. melanogaster in vivo Developmental processes
Genes Dev, 28 May 2020 DOI: 10.1101/gad.338194.120 Link to full text
Abstract: Graded transcription factors are pivotal regulators of embryonic patterning, but whether their role changes over time is unclear. A light-regulated protein degradation system was used to assay temporal dependence of the transcription factor Dorsal in dorsal-ventral axis patterning of Drosophila embryos. Surprisingly, the high-threshold target gene snail only requires Dorsal input early but not late when Dorsal levels peak. Instead, late snail expression can be supported by action of the Twist transcription factor, specifically, through one enhancer, sna.distal This study demonstrates that continuous input is not required for some Dorsal targets and downstream responses, such as twist, function as molecular ratchets.
12.

Application of optogenetic Amyloid-β distinguishes between metabolic and physical damage in neurodegeneration.

blue CRY2/CRY2 C. elegans in vivo D. melanogaster in vivo HEK293T zebrafish in vivo Developmental processes
Elife, 31 Mar 2020 DOI: 10.7554/elife.52589 Link to full text
Abstract: The brains of Alzheimer's Disease patients show a decrease in brain mass and a preponderance of extracellular Amyloid-β plaques. These plaques are formed by aggregation of polypeptides that are derived from the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP). Amyloid-β plaques are thought to play either a direct or an indirect role in disease progression, however the exact role of aggregation and plaque formation in the aetiology of Alzheimer's Disease is subject to debate as the biological effects of soluble and aggregated Amyloid-β peptides are difficult to separate in vivo. To investigate the consequences of formation of Amyloid-β oligomers in living tissues, we developed a fluorescently tagged, optogenetic Amyloid-β peptide that oligomerizes rapidly in the presence of blue light. We applied this system to the crucial question of how intracellular Amyloid-β oligomers underlie the pathologies of Alzheimer's Disease. We use Drosophila, C. elegans and D. rerio to show that, although both expression and induced oligomerization of Amyloid-β were detrimental to lifespan and healthspan, we were able to separate the metabolic and physical damage caused by light-induced Amyloid-β oligomerization from Amyloid-β expression alone. The physical damage caused by Amyloid-β oligomers also recapitulated the catastrophic tissue loss that is a hallmark of late AD. We show that the lifespan deficit induced by Amyloid-β oligomers was reduced with Li+ treatment. Our results present the first model to separate different aspects of disease progression.
13.

An Optogenetic Method to Study Signal Transduction in Intestinal StemCell Homeostasis.

blue CRY2/CRY2 D. melanogaster in vivo Signaling cascade control Cell differentiation
J Mol Biol, 19 Mar 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmb.2020.03.019 Link to full text
Abstract: Homeostasis in adult organs involves replacement of cells from a stem cell pool maintained in specialized niches regulated by extracellular signals. This cell-to-cell communication employs signal transduction pathways allowing cells to respond with a variety of behaviors. To study these cellular behaviors, signaling must be perturbed within tissues in precise patterns, a technique recently made possible by the development of optogenetic tools. We developed tools to study signal transduction in vivo in an adult fly midgut stem cell model where signaling was regulated by the application of light. Activation was achieved by clustering of membrane receptors EGFR and Toll, while inactivation was achieved by clustering the downstream activators ERK/Rolled and NFκB/Dorsal in the cytoplasm, preventing nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation. We show that both pathways contribute to stem and transit amplifying cell numbers and affect the lifespan of adult flies. We further present new approaches to overcome overexpression phenotypes and novel methods for the integration of optogenetics into the already-established genetic toolkit of Drosophila.
14.

Robustness of epithelial sealing is an emerging property of local ERK feedbacks driven by cell elimination.

blue CRY2/CRY2 D. melanogaster in vivo Cell death
bioRxiv, 18 Mar 2020 DOI: 10.1101/2020.03.17.994921 Link to full text
Abstract: While the pathways regulating apoptosis and cell extrusion are rather well described1,2, what regulates the precise spatio-temporal distribution of cell elimination in tissues remains largely unknown. This is particularly relevant for epithelia with high rates of cell elimination, a widespread situation during embryogenesis3-6 and homeostasis7, where concomitant death of neigbours could impair the maintenance of epithelial sealing. However, the extent to which epithelial tissues can cope with concomitant cell death, and whether any mechanism regulates such occurrence have never been explored so far. Here, using the Drosophila pupal notum (a single layer epithelium) and a new optogenetic tool to trigger caspase activation and cell extrusion, we first show that concomitant death of clusters of at least three cells is sufficient to transiently impair epithelial sealing. Such clustered extrusion was almost never observed in vivo, suggesting the existence of a mechanism preventing concomitant elimination of neighbours. Statistical analysis of cell death distribution in the notum highlighted a transient and local protective phase occurring near every dying cell. This protection is driven by a transient activation of ERK in the direct neighbours of extruding cells which reverts caspase activation and prevents elimination of cells in clusters. Altogether, this study demonstrates that the distribution of cell elimination in epithelia is an emerging property of transient and local feedbacks through ERK activation which is required to maintain epithelial sealing in conditions of high rate of cell elimination.
15.

Tissue-Scale Mechanical Coupling Reduces Morphogenetic Noise to Ensure Precision during Epithelial Folding.

blue CRY2/CIB1 D. melanogaster in vivo Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
Dev Cell, 3 Mar 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2020.02.012 Link to full text
Abstract: Morphological constancy is universal in developing systems. It is unclear whether precise morphogenesis stems from faithful mechanical interpretation of gene expression patterns. We investigate the formation of the cephalic furrow, an epithelial fold that is precisely positioned with a linear morphology. Fold initiation is specified by a precise genetic code with single-cell row resolution. This positional code activates and spatially confines lateral myosin contractility to induce folding. However, 20% of initiating cells are mis-specified because of fluctuating myosin intensities at the cellular level. Nevertheless, the furrow remains linearly aligned. We find that lateral myosin is planar polarized, integrating contractile membrane interfaces into supracellular "ribbons." Local reduction of mechanical coupling at the "ribbons" using optogenetics decreases furrow linearity. Furthermore, 3D vertex modeling indicates that polarized, interconnected contractility confers morphological robustness against noise. Thus, tissue-scale mechanical coupling functions as a denoising mechanism to ensure morphogenetic precision despite noisy decoding of positional information.
16.

Rapid Dynamics of Signal-Dependent Transcriptional Repression by Capicua.

blue iLID D. melanogaster in vivo Endogenous gene expression Developmental processes
Dev Cell, 26 Feb 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2020.02.004 Link to full text
Abstract: Optogenetic perturbations, live imaging, and time-resolved ChIP-seq assays in Drosophila embryos were used to dissect the ERK-dependent control of the HMG-box repressor Capicua (Cic), which plays critical roles in development and is deregulated in human spinocerebellar ataxia and cancers. We established that Cic target genes are activated before significant downregulation of nuclear localization of Cic and demonstrated that their activation is preceded by fast dissociation of Cic from the regulatory DNA. We discovered that both Cic-DNA binding and repression are rapidly reinstated in the absence of ERK activation, revealing that inductive signaling must be sufficiently sustained to ensure robust transcriptional response. Our work provides a quantitative framework for the mechanistic analysis of dynamics and control of transcriptional repression in development.
17.

Cell and tissue manipulation with ultrashort infrared laser pulses in light-sheet microscopy.

blue CRY2/CIB1 D. melanogaster in vivo Developmental processes
Sci Rep, 6 Feb 2020 DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-54349-x Link to full text
Abstract: Three-dimensional live imaging has become an indispensable technique in the fields of cell, developmental and neural biology. Precise spatio-temporal manipulation of biological entities is often required for a deeper functional understanding of the underlying biological process. Here we present a home-built integrated framework and optical design that combines three-dimensional light-sheet imaging over time with precise spatio-temporal optical manipulations induced by short infrared laser pulses. We demonstrate their potential for sub-cellular ablation of neurons and nuclei, tissue cauterization and optogenetics by using the Drosophila melanogaster and zebrafish model systems.
18.

Ras acts as a molecular switch between two forms of consolidated memory in Drosophila.

blue iLID D. melanogaster in vivo Signaling cascade control
Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 13 Jan 2020 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1819925117 Link to full text
Abstract: Long-lasting, consolidated memories require not only positive biological processes that facilitate long-term memories (LTM) but also the suppression of inhibitory processes that prevent them. The mushroom body neurons (MBn) in Drosophila melanogaster store protein synthesis-dependent LTM (PSD-LTM) as well as protein synthesis-independent, anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM). The formation of ARM inhibits PSD-LTM but the underlying molecular processes that mediate this interaction remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the Ras→Raf→rho kinase (ROCK) pathway in MBn suppresses ARM consolidation, allowing the formation of PSD-LTM. Our initial results revealed that the effects of Ras on memory are due to postacquisition processes. Ras knockdown enhanced memory expression but had no effect on acquisition. Additionally, increasing Ras activity optogenetically after, but not before, acquisition impaired memory performance. The elevated memory produced by Ras knockdown is a result of increased ARM. While Ras knockdown enhanced the consolidation of ARM, it eliminated PSD-LTM. We found that these effects are mediated by the downstream kinase Raf. Similar to Ras, knockdown of Raf enhanced ARM consolidation and impaired PSD-LTM. Surprisingly, knockdown of the canonical downstream extracellular signal-regulated kinase did not reproduce the phenotypes observed with Ras and Raf knockdown. Rather, Ras/Raf inhibition of ROCK was found to be responsible for suppressing ARM. Constitutively active ROCK enhanced ARM and impaired PSD-LTM, while decreasing ROCK activity rescued the enhanced ARM produced by Ras knockdown. We conclude that MBn Ras/Raf inhibition of ROCK suppresses the consolidation of ARM, which permits the formation of PSD-LTM.
19.

Optimizing photoswitchable MEK.

blue cyan iLID pdDronpa1 D. melanogaster in vivo zebrafish in vivo Signaling cascade control
Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 3 Dec 2019 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1912320116 Link to full text
Abstract: Optogenetic approaches are transforming quantitative studies of cell-signaling systems. A recently developed photoswitchable mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) enzyme (psMEK) short-circuits the highly conserved Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK)-signaling cascade at the most proximal step of effector kinase activation. However, since this optogenetic tool relies on phosphorylation-mimicking substitutions in the activation loop of MEK, its catalytic activity is predicted to be substantially lower than that of wild-type MEK that has been phosphorylated at these residues. Here, we present evidence that psMEK indeed has suboptimal functionality in vivo and propose a strategy to circumvent this limitation by harnessing gain-of-function, destabilizing mutations in MEK. Specifically, we demonstrate that combining phosphomimetic mutations with additional mutations in MEK, chosen for their activating potential, restores maximal kinase activity in vitro. We establish that this modification can be tuned by the choice of the destabilizing mutation and does not interfere with reversible activation of psMEK in vivo in both Drosophila and zebrafish. To illustrate the types of perturbations enabled by optimized psMEK, we use it to deliver pulses of ERK activation during zebrafish embryogenesis, revealing rheostat-like responses of an ERK-dependent morphogenetic event.
20.

Optogenetic inhibition of Delta reveals digital Notch signaling output during tissue differentiation.

blue CRY2/CIB1 CRY2olig D. melanogaster in vivo Signaling cascade control
EMBO Rep, 31 Oct 2019 DOI: 10.15252/embr.201947999 Link to full text
Abstract: Spatio-temporal regulation of signalling pathways plays a key role in generating diverse responses during the development of multicellular organisms. The role of signal dynamics in transferring signalling information in vivo is incompletely understood. Here we employ genome engineering in Drosophila melanogaster to generate a functional optogenetic allele of the Notch ligand Delta (opto-Delta), which replaces both copies of the endogenous wild type locus. Using clonal analysis, we show that optogenetic activation blocks Notch activation through cis-inhibition in signal-receiving cells. Signal perturbation in combination with quantitative analysis of a live transcriptional reporter of Notch pathway activity reveals differential tissue- and cell-scale regulatory modes. While at the tissue-level the duration of Notch signalling determines the probability with which a cellular response will occur, in individual cells Notch activation acts through a switch-like mechanism. Thus, time confers regulatory properties to Notch signalling that exhibit integrative digital behaviours during tissue differentiation.
21.

Coordination of protrusion dynamics within and between collectively migrating border cells by myosin II.

blue AsLOV2 D. melanogaster in vivo Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
Mol Biol Cell, 7 Aug 2019 DOI: 10.1091/mbc.e19-02-0124 Link to full text
Abstract: Collective cell migration is emerging as a major driver of embryonic development, organogenesis, tissue homeostasis, and tumor dissemination. In contrast to individually migrating cells, collectively migrating cells maintain cell-cell adhesions and coordinate direction-sensing as they move. While non-muscle myosin II has been studied extensively in the context of cells migrating individually in vitro, its roles in cells migrating collectively in three-dimensional, native environments are not fully understood. Here we use genetics, Airyscan microscopy, live imaging, optogenetics, and Förster resonance energy transfer to probe the localization, dynamics, and functions of myosin II in migrating border cells of the Drosophila ovary. We find that myosin accumulates transiently at the base of protrusions, where it functions to retract them. E-cadherin and myosin co-localize at border cell-border cell contacts and cooperate to transmit directional information. A phosphomimetic form of myosin is sufficient to convert border cells to a round morphology and blebbing migration mode. Together these studies demonstrate that distinct and dynamic pools of myosin II regulate protrusion dynamics within and between collectively migrating cells and suggest a new model for the role of protrusions in collective direction sensing in vivo. Movie S1 Movie S1 Live imaging of border cell specification and delamination from anterior epithelium From Figure 1D-I. Slbo promoter driving Lifeact-GFP (green) marks border cells, Upd-Gal4, UAS-DsRed.nls (red) mark polar cell nuclei. Hoechst 33342 (blue) marks DNA. Time resolution is 4 min. Movie S2 Movie S2 Representative Z-projected and registered live imaging of Sqh-mCherry accumulating in cortical junctions (flashing arrows) during border cell migration. From Figure 3J-K. Time resolution is 25 sec. Movie S3 Movie S3 Representative Z-projected and registered live imaging of E-cad-GFP during border cell migration. From Figure 3M-N. Time resolution is 60 sec. Movie S4 Movie S4 Representative Z-projection of control flpout cells from hs-Flp;, Slbo>Lifeact-GFP; AyGal4, UAS-RFP. Clonal cells are marked by magenta nuclei (nls-RFP). Time resolution is 2.5 min. From Supp. Figure 3 A-D. Movie S5 Movie S5 Representative Z-projection of Sqh-RNAi flpout cells from hs-Flp;, Slbo>Lifeact-GFP; AyGal4, UAS-RFP, UAS-sqh-RNAi. Clonal cells are marked by magenta nuclei (nls-RFP). Time resolution is 2.5 min. From Supp. Figure 3 E-H. Movie S6 Movie S6 Representative Z-projected c306-Gal4; tub-GAL80ts driving UAS-Lifeact-GFP and UAS-white RNAi. Time resolution is 2 min. From Supp. Figure 4 A-D. Movie S7 Movie S7 Representative Z-projected c306-Gal4; tub-GAL80ts driving UAS-Lifeact-GFP and UAS-sqh-RNAi showing frequent side protrusions. Time resolution is 2 min. From Supp. Figure 4 E-H. White arrows indicate ectopic side and rear protrusions. Movie S8 Movie S8 Representative Z-projected c306-Gal4; tub-GAL80ts driving UAS-Lifeact-GFP and UAS-sqh-RNAi showing long lived side protrusions. Time resolution is 2 min. From Supp. Figure 4 I-L. Movie S9 Movie S9 Representative Z-projected live imaging of c306-Gal4 driving UAS-white-RNAi in clusters co-expressing Lifeact-GFP under the control of the slbo enhancer and Sqh-mCherry from its endogenous promoter during periods of protrusive and round migration phases. From Figure 6A-D. 25 min corresponds to 6A and B and 1hr:25 min corresponds to 6C and D. Time resolution is 2.5 min. Movie S10 Movie S10 Sqh-mCherry (magenta) channel from Supplementary Movie 9. From Figure 6A-D. 25 min corresponds to 6A and B and 1hr:25 min corresponds to 6C and D. Time resolution is 2.5 min. Movie S11 Movie S11 Representative Z-projected live imaging of c306-Gal4 driving UAS-Ecad-RNAi in clusters co-expressing Lifeact-GFP under the control of the slbo enhancer and Sqh-mCherry from its endogenous promoter during a protrusive phase of migration. From Figure 6E-F. Time resolution is 2.5 min. Movie S12 Movie S12 Sqh-mCherry (magenta) channel from Supplementary Movie 11. From Figure 6E-F. Time resolution is 2.5 min. Movie S13 Movie S13 Representative Z-projected live imaging of c306-Gal4 driving UAS-Ecad-RNAi in clusters co-expressing Lifeact-GFP under the control of the slbo enhancer and Sqh-mCherry from its endogenous promoter during a rounded phase of migration. From Figure 6G-H. Time resolution is 2.5 min. Movie S14 Movie S14 Sqh-mCherry (magenta) channel from Supplementary Movie 13. From Figure 6G-H. Time resolution is 2.5 min. Movie S15 Movie S15 Example segmentation analysis from a representative Z-projected time lapse of a cluster expressing c306-Gal4 driving UAS-white-RNAi in clusters co-expressing Lifeact-GFP under the control of the slbo enhancer and Sqh-mCherry from its endogenous promoter during migration. Time lapse analyzed in Imaris by 1. segmentation of the cluster using Lifeact-GFP, 2. Rendering of Sqh-mCherry by masking the inside of the Life-act surface, 3. performing a distance transformation using the masked Sqh-mCherry that is color coded for distance from membrane (dark colors are short distances and bright/white colors are more distant), 4. combining the distance transformation with the Sqh-mCherry mask to only include the cortical 2 μm of the original Sqh-mCherry signal for quantification in Figure 6I. Movie S16 Movie S16 Representative Z-projected time lapse of Lifeact-GFP and Sqh-mCherry expressing clusters used for quantification of Figure 7B-C during protrusion/retractions cycles. Time resolution is 2 min. Movie S17 Movie S17 Sqh-mCherry channel from Supplementary movie 16. Time resolution is 2 min. Movie S18 Movie S18 Representative Z-projections of Lifeact-GFP (green) in c306-Gal4; tub-GAL80ts driving UAS-Lifeact-GFP and UAS-Sqh-E20E21 migrating border cells clusters that split. Time resolution is 2 min. Movie S19 Movie S19 Representative Z-projections of Lifeact-GFP (green) in c306-Gal4; tub-GAL80ts driving UAS-LifeactGFP and UAS-Sqh-E20E21 migrating border cells clusters during protrusive phase. Time resolution is 2 min. Movie S20 Movie S20 Representative Z-projection of Lifeact-GFP (green) in c306-Gal4; tub-GAL80ts driving UAS-Lifeact-GFP and UAS-Sqh-E20E21 border cells cluster at the oocyte border during a blebbing phase. Time resolution is 2 min. Movie S21 Movie S21 Representative Z-projection of control cluster expressing slbo-Gal4; UAS-PLCδ1-PH-GFP. Time resolution is 2 min. Movie S22 Movie S22 Representative Z-projection of cluster expressing slbo-Gal4; UAS-PLCδ1-PH-GFP, UAS-Rho1V14. Blebs are marked by white arrows. Time resolution is 2 min.
22.

Cross-linker-mediated regulation of actin network organization controls tissue morphogenesis.

blue CRY2/CIB1 D. melanogaster in vivo Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
J Cell Biol, 28 Jun 2019 DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201811127 Link to full text
Abstract: Contraction of cortical actomyosin networks driven by myosin activation controls cell shape changes and tissue morphogenesis during animal development. In vitro studies suggest that contractility also depends on the geometrical organization of actin filaments. Here we analyze the function of actomyosin network topology in vivo using optogenetic stimulation of myosin-II in Drosophila embryos. We show that early during cellularization, hexagonally arrayed actomyosin fibers are resilient to myosin-II activation. Actomyosin fibers then acquire a ring-like conformation and become contractile and sensitive to myosin-II. This transition is controlled by Bottleneck, a Drosophila unique protein expressed for only a short time during early cellularization, which we show regulates actin bundling. In addition, it requires two opposing actin cross-linkers, Filamin and Fimbrin. Filamin acts synergistically with Bottleneck to facilitate hexagonal patterning, while Fimbrin controls remodeling of the hexagonal network into contractile rings. Thus, actin cross-linking regulates the spatio-temporal organization of actomyosin contraction in vivo, which is critical for tissue morphogenesis.
23.

Self-Organized Nuclear Positioning Synchronizes the Cell Cycle in Drosophila Embryos.

blue CRY2/CIB1 D. melanogaster in vivo Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape Organelle manipulation
Cell, 9 Apr 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.03.007 Link to full text
Abstract: The synchronous cleavage divisions of early embryogenesis require coordination of the cell-cycle oscillator, the dynamics of the cytoskeleton, and the cytoplasm. Yet, it remains unclear how spatially restricted biochemical signals are integrated with physical properties of the embryo to generate collective dynamics. Here, we show that synchronization of the cell cycle in Drosophila embryos requires accurate nuclear positioning, which is regulated by the cell-cycle oscillator through cortical contractility and cytoplasmic flows. We demonstrate that biochemical oscillations are initiated by local Cdk1 inactivation and spread through the activity of phosphatase PP1 to generate cortical myosin II gradients. These gradients cause cortical and cytoplasmic flows that control proper nuclear positioning. Perturbations of PP1 activity and optogenetic manipulations of cortical actomyosin disrupt nuclear spreading, resulting in loss of cell-cycle synchrony. We conclude that mitotic synchrony is established by a self-organized mechanism that integrates the cell-cycle oscillator and embryo mechanics.
24.

Signaling Dynamics Control Cell Fate in the Early Drosophila Embryo.

blue iLID D. melanogaster in vivo Signaling cascade control Developmental processes
Dev Cell, 11 Feb 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2019.01.009 Link to full text
Abstract: The Erk mitogen-activated protein kinase plays diverse roles in animal development. Its widespread reuse raises a conundrum: when a single kinase like Erk is activated, how does a developing cell know which fate to adopt? We combine optogenetic control with genetic perturbations to dissect Erk-dependent fates in the early Drosophila embryo. We find that Erk activity is sufficient to "posteriorize" 88% of the embryo, inducing gut endoderm-like gene expression and morphogenetic movements in all cells within this region. Gut endoderm fate adoption requires at least 1 h of signaling, whereas a 30-min Erk pulse specifies a distinct ectodermal cell type, intermediate neuroblasts. We find that the endoderm-ectoderm cell fate switch is controlled by the cumulative load of Erk activity, not the duration of a single pulse. The fly embryo thus harbors a classic example of dynamic control, where the temporal profile of Erk signaling selects between distinct physiological outcomes.
25.

Continued Activity of the Pioneer Factor Zelda Is Required to Drive Zygotic Genome Activation.

blue CRY2/CRY2 D. melanogaster in vivo Endogenous gene expression
Mol Cell, 9 Feb 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.molcel.2019.01.014 Link to full text
Abstract: Reprogramming cell fate during the first stages of embryogenesis requires that transcriptional activators gain access to the genome and remodel the zygotic transcriptome. Nonetheless, it is not clear whether the continued activity of these pioneering factors is required throughout zygotic genome activation or whether they are only required early to establish cis-regulatory regions. To address this question, we developed an optogenetic strategy to rapidly and reversibly inactivate the master regulator of genome activation in Drosophila, Zelda. Using this strategy, we demonstrate that continued Zelda activity is required throughout genome activation. We show that Zelda binds DNA in the context of nucleosomes and suggest that this allows Zelda to occupy the genome despite the rapid division cycles in the early embryo. These data identify a powerful strategy to inactivate transcription factor function during development and suggest that reprogramming in the embryo may require specific, continuous pioneering functions to activate the genome.
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