Curated Optogenetic Publication Database

Search precisely and efficiently by using the advantage of the hand-assigned publication tags that allow you to search for papers involving a specific trait, e.g. a particular optogenetic switch or a host organism.

Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results
1.

Optogenetic Manipulation of Postsynaptic cAMP Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Line Enables Synaptic Plasticity and Enhances Depolarization Following Tetanic Stimulation in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus.

blue bPAC (BlaC) mouse hippocampal slices Immediate control of second messengers Neuronal activity control
Front Neural Circuits, 3 Jun 2020 DOI: 10.3389/fncir.2020.00024 Link to full text
Abstract: cAMP is a positive regulator tightly involved in certain types of synaptic plasticity and related memory functions. However, its spatiotemporal roles at the synaptic and neural circuit levels remain elusive. Using a combination of a cAMP optogenetics approach and voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging with electrophysiological recording, we define a novel capacity of postsynaptic cAMP in enabling dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (LTP) and depolarization in acutely prepared murine hippocampal slices. To manipulate cAMP levels at medial perforant path to granule neuron (MPP-DG) synapses by light, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing photoactivatable adenylyl cyclase (PAC) in DG granule neurons. Using these Tg(CMV-Camk2a-RFP/bPAC)3Koka mice, we recorded field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) from MPP-DG synapses and found that photoactivation of PAC during tetanic stimulation enabled synaptic potentiation that persisted for at least 30 min. This form of LTP was induced without the need for GABA receptor blockade that is typically required for inducing DG plasticity. The paired-pulse ratio (PPR) remained unchanged, indicating the cAMP-dependent LTP was likely postsynaptic. By employing fast fluorescent voltage-sensitive dye (VSD: di-4-ANEPPS) and fluorescence imaging, we found that photoactivation of the PAC actuator enhanced the intensity and extent of dentate gyrus depolarization triggered following tetanic stimulation. These results demonstrate that the elevation of cAMP in granule neurons is capable of rapidly enhancing synaptic strength and neuronal depolarization. The powerful actions of cAMP are consistent with this second messenger having a critical role in the regulation of synaptic function.
2.

SynaptoPAC, an Optogenetic Tool for Induction of Presynaptic Plasticity.

blue bPAC (BlaC) mouse hippocampal slices ND7/23 rat dentate gyrus granule neurons rat hippocampal neurons Neuronal activity control
bioRxiv, 27 Mar 2020 DOI: 10.1101/2020.03.27.011635 Link to full text
Abstract: Optogenetic manipulations have transformed neuroscience in recent years. While sophisticated tools now exist for controlling the firing patterns of neurons, it remains challenging to optogenetically define the plasticity state of individual synapses. A variety of synapses in the mammalian brain express presynaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) upon elevation of presynaptic cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), but the molecular expression mechanisms as well as the impact of presynaptic LTP on network activity and behavior are not fully understood. In order to establish optogenetic control of presynaptic cAMP levels and thereby presynaptic potentiation, we developed synaptoPAC, a presynaptically targeted version of the photoactivated adenylyl cyclase bPAC. In cultures of hippocampal granule cells, activation of synaptoPAC with blue light increases action potential-evoked transmission, an effect not seen in hippocampal cultures of non-granule cells. In acute brain slices, synaptoPAC activation immediately triggers a strong presynaptic potentiation at mossy fiber terminals in CA3, but not at Schaffer collateral synapse in CA1. Following light-triggered potentiation, mossy fiber transmission decreases within 20 minutes, but remains enhanced still after 30 min. Optogenetic potentiation alters the short-term plasticity dynamics of release, reminiscent of presynaptic LTP. SynaptoPAC is the first optogenetic tool that allows acute light-controlled potentiation of transmitter release at specific synapses of the brain, and will enable to investigate the role of presynaptic potentiation in network function and the animal’s behavior in an unprecedented manner.
3.

Potassium channel-based optogenetic silencing.

blue bPAC (BlaC) HEK293 mouse hippocampal slices mouse in vivo ND7/23 primary mouse hippocampal neurons rabbit cardiomyocytes zebrafish in vivo Immediate control of second messengers Neuronal activity control
Nat Commun, 5 Nov 2018 DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-07038-8 Link to full text
Abstract: Optogenetics enables manipulation of biological processes with light at high spatio-temporal resolution to control the behavior of cells, networks, or even whole animals. In contrast to the performance of excitatory rhodopsins, the effectiveness of inhibitory optogenetic tools is still insufficient. Here we report a two-component optical silencer system comprising photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs) and the small cyclic nucleotide-gated potassium channel SthK. Activation of this 'PAC-K' silencer by brief pulses of low-intensity blue light causes robust and reversible silencing of cardiomyocyte excitation and neuronal firing. In vivo expression of PAC-K in mouse and zebrafish neurons is well tolerated, where blue light inhibits neuronal activity and blocks motor responses. In combination with red-light absorbing channelrhodopsins, the distinct action spectra of PACs allow independent bimodal control of neuronal activity. PAC-K represents a reliable optogenetic silencer with intrinsic amplification for sustained potassium-mediated hyperpolarization, conferring high operational light sensitivity to the cells of interest.
4.

Optogenetic control of endogenous Ca(2+) channels in vivo.

blue AsLOV2 CRY2/CRY2 Cos-7 HEK293 HeLa hESCs HUVEC mouse astrocytes mouse hippocampal slices mouse in vivo NIH/3T3 primary mouse hippocampal neurons zebrafish in vivo Immediate control of second messengers
Nat Biotechnol, 14 Sep 2015 DOI: 10.1038/nbt.3350 Link to full text
Abstract: Calcium (Ca(2+)) signals that are precisely modulated in space and time mediate a myriad of cellular processes, including contraction, excitation, growth, differentiation and apoptosis. However, study of Ca(2+) responses has been hampered by technological limitations of existing Ca(2+)-modulating tools. Here we present OptoSTIM1, an optogenetic tool for manipulating intracellular Ca(2+) levels through activation of Ca(2+)-selective endogenous Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. Using OptoSTIM1, which combines a plant photoreceptor and the CRAC channel regulator STIM1 (ref. 4), we quantitatively and qualitatively controlled intracellular Ca(2+) levels in various biological systems, including zebrafish embryos and human embryonic stem cells. We demonstrate that activating OptoSTIM1 in the CA1 hippocampal region of mice selectively reinforced contextual memory formation. The broad utility of OptoSTIM1 will expand our mechanistic understanding of numerous Ca(2+)-associated processes and facilitate screening for drug candidates that antagonize Ca(2+) signals.
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