Curated Optogenetic Publication Database

Search precisely and efficiently by using the advantage of the hand-assigned publication tags that allow you to search for papers involving a specific trait, e.g. a particular optogenetic switch or a host organism.

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results
1.

Optogenetic control of morphogenesis goes 3D.

blue Cryptochromes Review
EMBO J, 21 Nov 2018 DOI: 10.15252/embj.2018100961 Link to full text
Abstract: The generation of form in living embryos, a process termed “morphogenesis” from the Greek word lοqφοcέmerg, is one of the most fascinating unsolved problems in biology. In embryonic epithelia, most attention has been paid to events occurring at the apical surface of epithelia, particularly the regulation of actomyosin contractility during morphogenetic change. In a new report, De Renzis and colleagues demonstrate a key role for regulated actomyosin contractility at the basal surface of the epithelium during formation of the first epithelial fold in Drosophila (the “ventral furrow”) (Krueger et al, 2018).
2.

Downregulation of basal myosin-II is required for cell shape changes and tissue invagination.

blue CRY2/CIB1 D. melanogaster in vivo Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape Developmental processes
EMBO J, 15 Nov 2018 DOI: 10.15252/embj.2018100170 Link to full text
Abstract: Tissue invagination drives embryo remodeling and assembly of internal organs during animal development. While the role of actomyosin-mediated apical constriction in initiating inward folding is well established, computational models suggest relaxation of the basal surface as an additional requirement. However, the lack of genetic mutations interfering specifically with basal relaxation has made it difficult to test its requirement during invagination so far. Here we use optogenetics to quantitatively control myosin-II levels at the basal surface of invaginating cells during Drosophila gastrulation. We show that while basal myosin-II is lost progressively during ventral furrow formation, optogenetics allows the maintenance of pre-invagination levels over time. Quantitative imaging demonstrates that optogenetic activation prior to tissue bending slows down cell elongation and blocks invagination. Activation after cell elongation and tissue bending has initiated inhibits cell shortening and folding of the furrow into a tube-like structure. Collectively, these data demonstrate the requirement of myosin-II polarization and basal relaxation throughout the entire invagination process.
3.

Spatio-temporally precise activation of engineered receptor tyrosine kinases by light.

blue AtLOV2 CrLOV1 NcWC1-LOV RsLOV VfAU1-LOV VVD CHO-K1 hBE HEK293 in vitro SPC212 Signaling cascade control Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
EMBO J, 1 Jul 2014 DOI: 10.15252/embj.201387695 Link to full text
Abstract: Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a large family of cell surface receptors that sense growth factors and hormones and regulate a variety of cell behaviours in health and disease. Contactless activation of RTKs with spatial and temporal precision is currently not feasible. Here, we generated RTKs that are insensitive to endogenous ligands but can be selectively activated by low-intensity blue light. We screened light-oxygen-voltage (LOV)-sensing domains for their ability to activate RTKs by light-activated dimerization. Incorporation of LOV domains found in aureochrome photoreceptors of stramenopiles resulted in robust activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and rearranged during transfection (RET). In human cancer and endothelial cells, light induced cellular signalling with spatial and temporal precision. Furthermore, light faithfully mimicked complex mitogenic and morphogenic cell behaviour induced by growth factors. RTKs under optical control (Opto-RTKs) provide a powerful optogenetic approach to actuate cellular signals and manipulate cell behaviour.
4.

Interaction of COP1 and UVR8 regulates UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis and stress acclimation in Arabidopsis.

UV UV receptors Background
EMBO J, 22 Jan 2009 DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2009.4 Link to full text
Abstract: The ultraviolet-B (UV-B) portion of the solar radiation functions as an environmental signal for which plants have evolved specific and sensitive UV-B perception systems. The UV-B-specific UV RESPONSE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) and the multifunctional E3 ubiquitin ligase CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) are key regulators of the UV-B response. We show here that uvr8-null mutants are deficient in UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis and hypersensitive to UV-B stress, whereas overexpression of UVR8 results in enhanced UV-B photomorphogenesis, acclimation and tolerance to UV-B stress. By using sun simulators, we provide evidence at the physiological level that UV-B acclimation mediated by the UV-B-specific photoregulatory pathway is indeed required for survival in sunlight. At the molecular level, we demonstrate that the wild type but not the mutant UVR8 and COP1 proteins directly interact in a UV-B-dependent, rapid manner in planta. These data collectively suggest that UV-B-specific interaction of COP1 and UVR8 in the nucleus is a very early step in signalling and responsible for the plant's coordinated response to UV-B ensuring UV-B acclimation and protection in the natural environment.
5.

VIVID is a flavoprotein and serves as a fungal blue light photoreceptor for photoadaptation.

blue LOV domains Background
EMBO J, 15 Sep 2003 DOI: 10.1093/emboj/cdg451 Link to full text
Abstract: Blue light regulates many physiological and developmental processes in fungi. Most of the blue light responses in the ascomycete Neurospora crassa are dependent on the two blue light regulatory proteins White Collar (WC)-1 and -2. WC-1 has recently been shown to be the first fungal blue light photoreceptor. In the present study, we characterize the Neurospora protein VIVID. VIVID shows a partial sequence similarity with plant blue light photoreceptors. In addition, we found that VIVID non-covalently binds a flavin chromophore. Upon illumination with blue light, VIVID undergoes a photocycle indicative of the formation of a flavin-cysteinyl adduct. VVD is localized in the cytoplasm and is only present after light induction. A loss-of-function vvd mutant was insensitive to increases in light intensities. Furthermore, mutational analysis of the photoactive cysteine indicated that the formation of a flavin-cysteinyl adduct is essential for VIVID functions in vivo. Our results show that VIVID is a second fungal blue light photoreceptor which enables Neurospora to perceive and respond to daily changes in light intensity.
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