Curated Optogenetic Publication Database

Search precisely and efficiently by using the advantage of the hand-assigned publication tags that allow you to search for papers involving a specific trait, e.g. a particular optogenetic switch or a host organism.

Showing 1 - 11 of 11 results
1.

Fungal Light-Oxygen-Voltage Domains for Optogenetic Control of Gene Expression and Flocculation in Yeast.

blue NcWC1-LOV VVD S. cerevisiae Transgene expression Control of cell-cell / cell-material interactions
MBio, 31 Jul 2018 DOI: 10.1128/mbio.00626-18 Link to full text
Abstract: Optogenetic switches permit accurate control of gene expression upon light stimulation. These synthetic switches have become a powerful tool for gene regulation, allowing modulation of customized phenotypes, overcoming the obstacles of chemical inducers, and replacing their use by an inexpensive resource: light. In this work, we implemented FUN-LOV, an optogenetic switch based on the photon-regulated interaction of WC-1 and VVD, two LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) blue-light photoreceptors from the fungus Neurospora crassa When tested in yeast, FUN-LOV yields light-controlled gene expression with exquisite temporal resolution and a broad dynamic range of over 1,300-fold, as measured by a luciferase reporter. We also tested the FUN-LOV switch for heterologous protein expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where Western blot analysis confirmed strong induction upon light stimulation, surpassing by 2.5 times the levels achieved with a classic GAL4/galactose chemical-inducible system. Additionally, we utilized FUN-LOV to control the ability of yeast cells to flocculate. Light-controlled expression of the flocculin-encoding gene FLO1, by the FUN-LOV switch, yielded flocculation in light (FIL), whereas the light-controlled expression of the corepressor TUP1 provided flocculation in darkness (FID). Altogether, the results reveal the potential of the FUN-LOV optogenetic switch to control two biotechnologically relevant phenotypes such as heterologous protein expression and flocculation, paving the road for the engineering of new yeast strains for industrial applications. Importantly, FUN-LOV's ability to accurately manipulate gene expression, with a high temporal dynamic range, can be exploited in the analysis of diverse biological processes in various organisms.IMPORTANCE Optogenetic switches are molecular devices which allow the control of different cellular processes by light, such as gene expression, providing a versatile alternative to chemical inducers. Here, we report a novel optogenetic switch (FUN-LOV) based on the LOV domain interaction of two blue-light photoreceptors (WC-1 and VVD) from the fungus N. crassa In yeast cells, FUN-LOV allowed tight regulation of gene expression, with low background in darkness and a highly dynamic and potent control by light. We used FUN-LOV to optogenetically manipulate, in yeast, two biotechnologically relevant phenotypes, heterologous protein expression and flocculation, resulting in strains with potential industrial applications. Importantly, FUN-LOV can be implemented in diverse biological platforms to orthogonally control a multitude of cellular processes.
2.

Photoreceptor engineering.

blue cyan red UV Cryptochromes Fluorescent proteins LOV domains Phytochromes UV receptors Review
Front Mol Biosci, 17 Jun 2015 DOI: 10.3389/fmolb.2015.00030 Link to full text
Abstract: Sensory photoreceptors not only control diverse adaptive responses in Nature, but as light-regulated actuators they also provide the foundation for optogenetics, the non-invasive and spatiotemporally precise manipulation of cellular events by light. Novel photoreceptors have been engineered that establish control by light over manifold biological processes previously inaccessible to optogenetic intervention. Recently, photoreceptor engineering has witnessed a rapid development, and light-regulated actuators for the perturbation of a plethora of cellular events are now available. Here, we review fundamental principles of photoreceptors and light-regulated allostery. Photoreceptors dichotomize into associating receptors that alter their oligomeric state as part of light-regulated allostery and non-associating receptors that do not. A survey of engineered photoreceptors pinpoints light-regulated association reactions and order-disorder transitions as particularly powerful and versatile design principles. Photochromic photoreceptors that are bidirectionally toggled by two light colors augur enhanced spatiotemporal resolution and use as photoactivatable fluorophores. By identifying desirable traits in engineered photoreceptors, we provide pointers for the design of future, light-regulated actuators.
3.

Spatio-temporally precise activation of engineered receptor tyrosine kinases by light.

blue AtLOV2 CrLOV1 NcWC1-LOV RsLOV VfAU1-LOV VVD CHO-K1 hBE HEK293 in vitro SPC212 Signaling cascade control Control of cytoskeleton / cell motility / cell shape
EMBO J, 1 Jul 2014 DOI: 10.15252/embj.201387695 Link to full text
Abstract: Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a large family of cell surface receptors that sense growth factors and hormones and regulate a variety of cell behaviours in health and disease. Contactless activation of RTKs with spatial and temporal precision is currently not feasible. Here, we generated RTKs that are insensitive to endogenous ligands but can be selectively activated by low-intensity blue light. We screened light-oxygen-voltage (LOV)-sensing domains for their ability to activate RTKs by light-activated dimerization. Incorporation of LOV domains found in aureochrome photoreceptors of stramenopiles resulted in robust activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and rearranged during transfection (RET). In human cancer and endothelial cells, light induced cellular signalling with spatial and temporal precision. Furthermore, light faithfully mimicked complex mitogenic and morphogenic cell behaviour induced by growth factors. RTKs under optical control (Opto-RTKs) provide a powerful optogenetic approach to actuate cellular signals and manipulate cell behaviour.
4.

Light-inducible system for tunable protein expression in Neurospora crassa.

blue LOV domains Background
G3 (Bethesda), 1 Oct 2012 DOI: 10.1534/g3.112.003939 Link to full text
Abstract: Filamentous fungi are important model systems for understanding eukaryotic cellular processes, including the study of protein expression. A salient feature of fungi is the ability of the protein-processing machinery to perform all of the extensive posttranslational modifications needed in the complex world of eukaryotic organisms, making them great hosts for production of eukaryotic proteins. In the model organism Neurospora crassa, several regulatable promoters have been used for heterologous gene expression but all suffer from leaky expression absent stimuli or an inability to induce protein expression at levels greater than those seen in vivo. To increase and better control in vivo protein expression in Neurospora, we have harnessed the light-induced vvd promoter. vvd promoter-driven mRNA expression is dependent upon light, shows a graded response, and is rapidly shut off when returned to the dark. The vvd promoter is a highly tunable and regulatable system, which could be a useful instrument for those interested in efficient and controllable gene expression.
5.

LOV to BLUF: flavoprotein contributions to the optogenetic toolkit.

blue BLUF domains LOV domains Review
Mol Plant, 19 Mar 2012 DOI: 10.1093/mp/sss020 Link to full text
Abstract: Optogenetics is an emerging field that combines optical and genetic approaches to non-invasively interfere with cellular events with exquisite spatiotemporal control. Although it arose originally from neuroscience, optogenetics is widely applicable to the study of many different biological systems and the range of applications arising from this technology continues to increase. Moreover, the repertoire of light-sensitive proteins used for devising new optogenetic tools is rapidly expanding. Light, Oxygen, or Voltage sensing (LOV) and Blue-Light-Utilizing flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) (BLUF) domains represent new contributors to the optogenetic toolkit. These small (100-140-amino acids) flavoprotein modules are derived from plant and bacterial photoreceptors that respond to UV-A/blue light. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in uncovering the photoactivation mechanisms of both LOV and BLUF domains. This knowledge has been applied in the design of synthetic photoswitches and fluorescent reporters with applications in cell biology and biotechnology. In this review, we summarize the photochemical properties of LOV and BLUF photosensors and highlight some of the recent advances in how these flavoproteins are being employed to artificially regulate and image a variety of biological processes.
6.

The evolution of flavin-binding photoreceptors: an ancient chromophore serving trendy blue-light sensors.

blue BLUF domains LOV domains Review Background
Annu Rev Plant Biol, 15 Nov 2011 DOI: 10.1146/annurev-arplant-042811-105538 Link to full text
Abstract: Photoreceptor flavoproteins of the LOV, BLUF, and cryptochrome families are ubiquitous among the three domains of life and are configured as UVA/blue-light systems not only in plants-their original arena-but also in prokaryotes and microscopic algae. Here, we review these proteins' structure and function, their biological roles, and their evolution and impact in the living world, and underline their growing application in biotechnologies. We present novel developments such as the interplay of light and redox stimuli, emerging enzymatic and biological functions, lessons on evolution from picoalgae, metagenomics analysis, and optogenetics applications.
7.

Function, structure and mechanism of bacterial photosensory LOV proteins.

blue LOV domains Review Background
Nat Rev Microbiol, 8 Aug 2011 DOI: 10.1038/nrmicro2622 Link to full text
Abstract: LOV (light, oxygen or voltage) domains are protein photosensors that are conserved in bacteria, archaea, plants and fungi, and detect blue light via a flavin cofactor. LOV domains are present in both chemotrophic and phototrophic bacterial species, in which they are found amino-terminally of signalling and regulatory domains such as sensor histidine kinases, diguanylate cyclases-phosphodiesterases, DNA-binding domains and regulators of RNA polymerase σ-factors. In this Review, we describe the current state of knowledge about the function of bacterial LOV proteins, the structural basis of LOV domain-mediated signal transduction, and the use of LOV domains as genetically encoded photoswitches in synthetic biology.
8.

Lights on and action! Controlling microbial gene expression by light.

blue green near-infrared red BLUF domains Cryptochromes Cyanobacteriochromes Fluorescent proteins LOV domains Phytochromes Review
Appl Microbiol Biotechnol, 20 Feb 2011 DOI: 10.1007/s00253-011-3141-6 Link to full text
Abstract: Light-mediated control of gene expression and thus of any protein function and metabolic process in living microbes is a rapidly developing field of research in the areas of functional genomics, systems biology, and biotechnology. The unique physical properties of the environmental factor light allow for an independent photocontrol of various microbial processes in a noninvasive and spatiotemporal fashion. This mini review describes recently developed strategies to generate photo-sensitive expression systems in bacteria and yeast. Naturally occurring and artificial photoswitches consisting of light-sensitive input domains derived from different photoreceptors and regulatory output domains are presented and individual properties of light-controlled expression systems are discussed.
9.

Tripping the light fantastic: blue-light photoreceptors as examples of environmentally modulated protein-protein interactions.

blue Cryptochromes Fluorescent proteins LOV domains Review
Biochemistry, 14 Dec 2010 DOI: 10.1021/bi101665s Link to full text
Abstract: Blue-light photoreceptors play a pivotal role in detecting the quality and quantity of light in the environment, controlling a wide range of biological responses. Several families of blue-light photoreceptors have been characterized in detail using biophysics and biochemistry, beginning with photon absorption, through intervening signal transduction, to regulation of biological activities. Here we review the light oxygen voltage, cryptochrome, and sensors of blue light using FAD families, three different groups of proteins that offer distinctly different modes of photochemical activation and signal transduction yet play similar roles in a vast array of biological responses. We cover mechanisms of light activation and propagation of conformational responses that modulate protein-protein interactions involved in biological signaling. Discovery and characterization of these processes in natural proteins are now allowing the design of photoregulatable engineered proteins, facilitating the generation of novel reagents for biochemical and cell biological research.
10.

The LOV domain family: photoresponsive signaling modules coupled to diverse output domains.

blue Fluorescent proteins LOV domains Review Background
Biochemistry, 14 Jan 2003 DOI: 10.1021/bi026978l Link to full text
Abstract: For single-cell and multicellular systems to survive, they must accurately sense and respond to their cellular and extracellular environment. Light is a nearly ubiquitous environmental factor, and many species have evolved the capability to respond to this extracellular stimulus. Numerous photoreceptors underlie the activation of light-sensitive signal transduction cascades controlling these responses. Here, we review the properties of the light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) family of blue-light photoreceptor domains, a subset of the Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) superfamily. These flavin-binding domains, first identified in the higher-plant phototropins, are now shown to be present in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Notably, LOV domains are coupled to a wide array of other domains, including kinases, phosphodiesterases, F-box domains, STAS domains, and zinc fingers, which suggests that the absorption of blue light by LOV domains regulates the activity of these structurally and functionally diverse domains. LOV domains contain a conserved molecular volume extending from the flavin cofactor, which is the locus for light-driven structural change, to the molecular surface. We discuss the role of this conserved volume of structure in LOV-regulated processes.
11.

BLUF: a novel FAD-binding domain involved in sensory transduction in microorganisms.

blue red BLUF domains Fluorescent proteins LOV domains Phytochromes Background
Trends Biochem Sci, 1 Oct 2002 DOI: 10.1016/s0968-0004(02)02181-3 Link to full text
Abstract: A novel FAD-binding domain, BLUF, exemplified by the N-terminus of the AppA protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, is present in various proteins, primarily from Bacteria. The BLUF domain is involved in sensing blue-light (and possibly redox) using FAD and is similar to the flavin-binding PAS domains and cryptochromes. The predicted secondary structure reveals that the BLUF domain is a novel FAD-binding fold.
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